Related Content: politics

Eating One’s Peas and Other Dilemmas

Gwen's Take

It’s a conundrum. We in the news business are constantly justifying to ourselves why we cover the stories we cover, and why you should care.

It is the second part of that formula that confounds news decision makers on a daily basis. Because if you don’t care, you don’t watch. And we kind of like it when you watch.

On the Radar: June 23, 2011

Legacy: On The Radar

PBS NewsHour: What More Could, Should Government Do for U.S. Economy?

Web content

June 7, 2011

A new Washington Post/ABC News poll finds that 57 percent of those surveyed say an economic turnaround has not yet begun in the U.S. Gwen Ifill discusses what's next for the economy -- and the political implications -- with USA Today's Susan Page, Wells Fargo economist Mark Vitner and Tom Binnings of Summit Economics.

April 8, 2011

Weekly Show

With a $39 billion spending cut agreed upon, the possibility of a government shutdown is finally over.  The panel discusses why leaders of neither side wanted a shutdown in the first place, and how their constituents may feel. Joining Gwen Ifill: John Dickerson, Slate Magazine/CBS News; Michael Duffy, TIME Magazine; and Jeanne Cummings, Politico.
 

April 1, 2011

Weekly Show

Encouraging new unemployment figures arrive as Congress debates the budget and tries to avoid a government shutdown. Also, the U.S. hands over some military control in Libya to NATO. Plus, the panel looks at the 2012 GOP hopefuls. Joining Gwen Ifill: Yochi Dreazen, National Journal; Greg Ip, The Economist; Naftali Bendavid, The Wall Street Journal; and Karen Tumulty, The Washington Post.
 

March 18, 2011

Weekly Show

President Obama and the U.N. warn Moammar Gadhafi to stop military action against rebels or face consequences. Meanwhile, after the earthquake, tsunami and partial nuclear plant meltdown in Japan, the U.S. reviews nuclear safety and a look at the global economic impact of the disaster.  Joining Gwen: Tom Gjelten, NPR; Coral Davenport, National Journal; and David Wessel, Wall Street Journal.
 

Of Symbols and Meaning: Part Two

Gwen's Take

Last week in this space, I mused about how quick we can be to over interpret events and ascribe tenuous meaning to actions that so often defy explanation.

Less than forty-eight hours after I posted that column, 19 people were gunned down in a Tucson parking lot---six died---and suddenly we were sucked into a situation in which symbolism seems all too real.

Guns. Mental illness. Overheated political speech. Personal security. Everyone flocked to their favorite theory.

On the Radar: August 9, 2010

Legacy: On The Radar

Unconventional Wisdom

Gwen's Take

I am frequently wrong. Now there’s an admission you won’t hear that often from someone who makes a living in Washington.

But this most recent round of primary results reminded me of all of the times I have assumed outcomes and wound up on the wrong end of a prediction. There are sitting members of Congress who still give me the hairy eyeball when we meet because I underestimated them once. This is the real reason I am not a pundit. I hate being wrong, and am so good at it.

On the Radar: June 7, 2010

Legacy: On The Radar