Related Content: jobs

Obama Unveils Outsourcing Attack Against Romney

On The Radar

Without ever mentioning Mitt Romney by name, President Obama on Wednesday introduced a theme he’s certain to use often against the leading candidate for the Republican presidential nomination: that he helped send American jobs overseas during his corporate career.
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In NH, GOP Voters' Questions Often Omit Jobs

On The Radar

Judging from the presidential forums being held all over New Hampshire ahead of Tuesday's Republican primary, the biggest threats to America appear to be online piracy, an insidious United Nations and "crony capitalism." Rick Santorum, for instance, fielded questions for 48 minutes from a crowd of 600 in Windham on Thursday before anyone mentioned jobs, the issue that's supposed to dominate the 2012 elections.
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January 6, 2012

Weekly Show

This week, we’re on the ground in Manchester, New Hampshire to preview the primaries. After a close finish in Iowa, will Mitt Romney stay ahead of the pack in the Granite State? Joining Gwen: Dan Balz,  Washington Post; John Dickerson, Slate Magazine and CBS News; Julianna Goldman, Bloomberg News; John Harwood, CNBC and The New York Times.
 

Dems: Romney is Easier Jobs Target than Gingrich

On The Radar

Conventional wisdom, supported by polls, maintains that Mitt Romney would be a tougher opponent than Newt Gingrich against President Barack Obama. But one factor keeps Democrats from salivating over Gingrich's rise in the Republican presidential race: Romney may present a fatter target on jobs, the issue expected to dominate the 2012 contest.
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Obama Takes Populist Economic Message to the Heartland

On The Radar

President Obama rolled out the major themes of his reelection bid in a speech in which he sought to capture public concern about rising economic inequality and wrap his policies in a call for a "fair shot" for America's middle class. Growing inequality "is the defining issue of our time," Obama said in a nearly hourlong address here Tuesday. "This is a make-or-break moment for the middle class, and all those who are fighting to get into the middle class.

U.S. Unemployment Rate Falls to 8.6%

On The Radar

For months, political analysts have been saying that President Obama's reelection hopes hinge on the economy, with an unemployment rate of 9% or higher certain to pose serious problems for the White House. On Friday, the Labor Department announced an unexpectedly sharp decline in the November unemployment rate, to 8.6% from 9% in October, raising hopes of an accelerated recovery.

"Better Buildings" Bring Obama, Bill Clinton Together Again

On The Radar

They share a high regard for the secretary of state. They love policy conundrums, government, and being best-selling authors. They know firsthand that it's the economy, stupid. And on Friday, Barack Obama and Bill Clinton will join forces in Washington to tout "Better Buildings" as a public-private initiative that can save energy, money and create (even without new legislation) somewhere between 35,000 and 50,000 jobs.

U.S. Companies Add Workers Abroad, Cut at Home

On The Radar

U.S.-based multinational corporations added 1.5 million workers to their payrolls in Asia and the Pacific during the 2000s, and 477,500 workers in Latin America, while cutting payrolls at home by 864,000. David Wessel has details on The News Hub.

The President's Agenda

On The Radar

For Alan Krueger, recently confirmed by the Senate to be chairman of the White House Council of Economic Advisers, this is a second tour in the Obama administration. In 2009-10, he served as the Treasury's top economist. Last year he returned to Princeton University, where he is a professor of economics. But President Obama called him back this fall to join his economic team, calling particularly on Mr. Krueger's expertise on labor-market issues at a time of persistently high unemployment.

Obama and Veterans: Can a Hawkish Dove Gain Their Support?

On The Radar

Sen. John McCain, a former Navy pilot and prisoner of war, captured the lion's share of the millions of ballots cast by active-duty military and veterans in 2008. His leg-up with that demographic was no secret well before Election Day. Now comes a question for 2012: Will a Republican presidential nominee do as well or better challenging commander-in-chief Obama among military voters?