Related Content: GOP

On the Radar: March 28, 2011

Legacy: On The Radar

On the Radar: March 22, 2011

Legacy: On The Radar

On the Radar: March 21, 2011

Legacy: On The Radar

Mixed Signals

Gwen's Take

When to Send Them; How to Read Them

I was sitting behind the wheel on Pennsylvania Avenue Thursday afternoon in the kind of traffic clog that those of us who live in Washington, DC have become accustomed to. The clamor of sirens signaled that President Obama’s motorcade was about to pass. And until he – and about 14 other speeding vehicles carrying the Presidential entourage – sped by, the rest of us would not be going anywhere.

On the Radar: March 16, 2011

Legacy: On The Radar

On the Radar: March 15, 2011

Legacy: On The Radar

PBS NewsHour: GOP, Democrats Spar Over Spending Cuts as Budget Battle Threatens Shutdown

Web content

March 8, 2011 

Lawmakers have until March 18 to reach a budget agreement to keep the government operating, but the two parties disagree greatly on the amount to cut from this year's spending. Gwen Ifill talks with Political Editor David Chalian about the continuing budget stalemate as lawmakers prepare for the next showdown over spending.
 

On the Radar: March 1, 2011

Legacy: On The Radar

February 18, 2011

Weekly Show

Spreading unrest in Bahrain causes a military crackdown while tensions in Yemen and Iran flair up. The Obama administration urges democratic reform while trying to protect strategic relationships.  At home, Republicans and Democrats fight over federal budget priorities.  Gwen is joined by Doyle McManus, LA Times; Jim Sciutto, ABC News; Jeanne Cummings, POLITICO; and John Dickerson, Slate/CBS News.
 

Meaning What You Say

Gwen's Take

It’s a familiar cycle. Voters say they want new faces and fresh thinking in Washington. But once the newcomers arrive in the nation’s capital, they discover themselves consigned to back benches and basement offices.

Reality soon sets in. It’s harder than it seems to get things done.

But in both the House and the Senate this year, first-termers are making their presence felt on deficit spending, defense budgets, anti-terror laws -- and even Big Bird.