Related Content: Iran

Sanctions' Squeeze On Iran Tightens

On The Radar

The squeeze on the Iranian economy due to international sanctions is turning into a stranglehold. The latest sign of Iran's economic trouble is a new drop in the country's oil output. And last week brought a new punishment: Iranian banks were barred from participating in a key international clearinghouse.
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Obama, Cameron Stress Diplomatic Pressure on Syria, Iran

On The Radar

After meetings at the White House with British Prime Minister David Cameron, President Obama said Wednesday that the U.S. military “plans for everything” when weighing options to end the violence in Syria. He emphasized, however, that the U.S. and U.K. remain focused on pressuring Bashar al-Assad diplomatically and politically to relinquish power, and the two leaders discussed a commitment to humanitarian assistance to aid the suffering Syrian people.

March 9, 2012

Weekly Show

Mitt Romney won big on Super Tuesday, giving him more than 35% of the delegates needed to clinch the nomination. But Rick Santorum, Newt Gingrich, and Ron Paul stay defiant, continuing their campaigns as the race focuses on Mississippi and Alabama next Tuesday. What's next? Joining Gwen: Jeff Zeleny, New York Times; Beth Reinhard, National Journal; Doyle McManus, Los Angeles Times.

 

Panetta: U.S. Has Potential Military Plans for Iran

On The Radar

The Pentagon is preparing an array of military options for striking Iran if hard-hitting diplomatic and economic sanctions fail to persuade Tehran to drop its nuclear ambitions, Defense Secretary Leon Panetta told National Journal in an interview on Thursday.
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Obama Scolds G.O.P. Critics of Iran Policy

On The Radar

President Obama on Tuesday forcefully rebuked Republicans on the presidential campaign trail and in Congress for “beating the drums of war” in criticizing his efforts to find a diplomatic solution to the crisis over Iran’s nuclear program, underscoring how squarely the national security issue had entered the election-year debate.
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Netanyahu and Obama Still Divided Over Iran

On The Radar

President Obama and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu have been working hard to present a united front on Iran, the nation at the heart of a simmering dispute between the two close allies. But there is no disguising the fact that the two leaders remain sharply divided on the way forward.
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Candidates Hammer Obama Over Iran, but Approaches Differ Little

On The Radar

To rein in Tehran’s nuclear ambitions, Mitt Romney says he would conduct naval exercises in the Persian Gulf to remind Iran of American military might. He would try to ratchet up Security Council sanctions on Iran, targeting its Revolutionary Guards, and the country’s central bank and other financial institutions. And if Russia and China do not go along, he says, the United States should team up with other willing governments to put such punitive measures in place.

PBS NewsHour: Obama, Netanyahu Show Unity, Yet Signal Differences, Over Iran Strategy

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President Obama and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu met Monday at the White House to discuss possible solutions to threats from Iran's nuclear program, pledging unity but signalling tension over how to proceed. Gwen Ifill reports.

PBS NewsHour: As U.S., Israel Navigate Tensions Over Iran, Are 'All Options on the Table?'

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President Obama and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu showed some areas of disagreement Monday over potential solutions to an Iranian nuclear threat, disputing whether diplomacy or military action would be a better move. Gwen Ifill discusses how the leaders are dealing with their differences with Jeffrey Goldberg of The Atlantic Magazine, Jamie Fly of The Foreign Policy Initiative and James Dobbins of Rand Corporation.

Israel's Brinkmanship, America's Peril

On The Radar

Last week, Gen. Norton A. Schwartz, chief of staff of the U.S. Air Force, confirmed a no-longer-surprising fact: the Pentagon has sent the White House a menu of options for going to war with Iran. But that doesn't mean the military thinks bombing Iran would be a good idea. "It's not prudent at this point to decide to attack Iran," Schwartz's boss, Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said on CNN last month, adding that his advice applied to Israel as well as the United States.