Related Content: On the Radar

Why Ron Paul Draws Big Crowds but Fails to Catch on

On The Radar

At first glance, Benjamin Stolz would appear to be the perfect prize for Republican presidential candidate Ron Paul. Stolz, a freshman at the University of Maryland, agrees wholeheartedly with Paul on a range of issues — from seeing foreign intervention as too costly to agreeing that government spending should be cut. Stolz, an enthusiastic 18-year-old who has never voted, also admires Paul’s frankness and the Texas congressman’s ability to draw diverse crowds.

Chief Justice Roberts May Cast Deciding Healthcare Vote

On The Radar

During three days of historic healthcare arguments at the Supreme Court, Chief Justice John Roberts presided with a steady calm and folksy charm. From his center seat on the nine-member bench, Roberts gently mediated as colleagues interrupted one another's questions this week.
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Senate Thwarts Obama Bid to End Oil/Gas Subsidies

On The Radar

President Obama and the Democratic majority in the Senate tried Thursday to use tax benefits enjoyed by oil and gas companies as a partisan weapon against the sting of rising gasoline prices. It didn’t quite work -- the Senate, with help from four Democrats, defeated a procedural measure aimed at ending the tax benefits -- but the president and his congressional allies argued with gusto that big oil companies and the Republicans who support them are hurting American consumers.

Labor Pains

On The Radar

Mitt Romney should be good to go, ready to pivot toward the general election—and there would be no better place to start than Tuesday’s primary in Wisconsin. The state hasn’t voted for a Republican nominee since Ronald Reagan, but close elections in 2000 and 2004 branded it a battleground. Two years after President Obama solidly won the state with 56 percent of the vote, Republicans staged a comeback by winning the Governor’s Mansion, a Senate seat, and two House seats. In Wisconsin, moderates—and cheese-heads—rule.

Poll: Senate Democrats Lead in Florida, Ohio

On The Radar

Propelled by strong support among women in two swing states, Senate Democrats in Ohio and Florida are sitting on wide leads over their Republican challengers, according to a pair of Quinnipiac University polls that bodes well for Democratic efforts to keep their Senate majority.
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On Health Care, are Republicans Ready for Victory?

On The Radar

Three days of oral arguments at the Supreme Court have given Republicans reason for optimism that President Obama’s health-care law could be heading for a legal defeat in a few months. But would such a victory for the GOP this summer mean political success for the party in November and beyond?
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Reeling White House Steps Into Health Care Breach

On The Radar

The Obama White House, beset by a barrage of liberal criticism over an allegedly inept defense of its signature domestic policy achievement, on Wednesday defended the health care law's constitutionality not on legal grounds but on purely partisan ones. “The individual-responsibility provision was originally a Republican idea,” said White House deputy press secretary Josh Earnest at the daily briefing, altering the common terminology “individual mandate” to the theoretically more politically palatable “individual responsibility.”

Obama Lawyer Asks Supreme Court to Save Healthcare Law

On The Radar

The Obama administration's top courtroom lawyer made an impassioned plea on Wednesday for the Supreme Court to save President Barack Obama's healthcare law, capping three days of historic arguments that left it unclear how the nine justices would rule. Having peppered lawyers for and against the law with questions for more than six hours over the three days, the justices withdrew to their chambers to begin up to three months of deliberation expected to yield a decision by late June.

Clock Ticks on U.S.'s Fiscal Time Bomb

On The Radar

Pundits and pollsters speculate hourly on the outcome of the next Republican presidential primary. Business executives and investors increasingly focus on whether Congress and the president will defuse the fiscal time bomb they have built—or whether they will be so paralyzed that the bomb will go off at year-end.
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Can Health Care Law Survive Without Insurance Mandate?

On The Radar