Related Content: Congress

Congress's Payroll Standoff - Who Blinks First?

On The Radar

Less than two weeks remain – with a holiday in between – for Congress to keep alive a payroll-tax cut, unemployment insurance, and a “doc fix” patch. Here is how it could play out.
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Payroll Tax Fight Heats Up

On The Radar

Neither side in the payroll tax fight is showing signs of backing down, reports CNBC's Eamon Javers.

Obama Blasts House GOP for Blocking Payroll Tax Cut Extension

On The Radar

While members of Congress point fingers at each other for gumming up the payroll tax cut, President Obama is watching the bickering from the White House--where he is apparently happy to spend the holiday season until a deal gets done. The rest of the Obama family has gone ahead to Hawaii for their pre-planned holiday trip. But aides say the president will continue to delay his vacation in hopes of inspiring House Republicans to take up a Senate-approved measure extending the tax cut beyond midnight New Year’s Eve.

House Rejects 2-Month Extension of Payroll Tax Cut

On The Radar

The Republican-controlled House on Tuesday rejected a Senate-approved two-month extension of a payroll tax cut and unemployment benefits to millions of Americans, raising the likelihood that both will expire on Dec. 31.The House effectively adjourned for the year following the vote, and with the Senate out of town for the holiday, there is no resolution in sight on a legislative battle waged by House Republicans over the length of the benefits' extension. Both chambers can return to Washington at the call of party leaders if there is an agreement.

Payroll Tax: A High Stakes Game of Chicken?

On The Radar

CNBC's John Harwood has the latest details on the payroll tax cut fight on Capitol Hill, and debating the merits of a full- year versus a two-month version of the bill, with Rep. Brad Sherman, (D-CA), and Rep. Nan Hayworth, (R-NY).

PBS NewsHour: White House, GOP Ratchet Up Rhetoric on 'Responsible' Deal for Payroll Tax Cut

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The way forward on extending the payroll tax cut remained murky Monday as House Republicans vowed to turn back a compromise measure passed by the Senate over the weekend. Gwen Ifill discusses the stalemate with Rep. Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah, and Gene Sperling, a senior economic adviser to President Obama.

House Speaker Foresees Extension of Payroll Tax Cuts

On The Radar

House Speaker John Boehner told USA TODAY on Monday that he was optimistic that payroll tax cuts and unemployment benefits would be extended — despite a congressional stalemate that could result in millions of Americans losing both in the new year.
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Congressional Committees, RIP: 1789-2011

On The Radar

Committees don’t count in the House and Senate anymore. Almost all important pieces of legislation passed by the 112th Congress emerged not from the traditional process of committee members debating and marking up bills, but from backroom negotiations among party leaders. The latest examples are the compromises on extending the payroll-tax cut and unemployment benefits hashed out among congressional leaders this week.

Boehner: House Opposes Senate Payroll Tax Bill

On The Radar

The Senate’s two-month payroll tax extension is dead on arrival in the House. House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, made that perfectly clear Sunday morning as he said that Congress will have to negotiate a deal closer to the House-passed one-year extension before members leave for the holidays. “Well, it’s pretty clear that I and our members oppose the Senate bill – it’s only for two months,” Boehner said on NBC’s Meet the Press. “If you talk to employers, they talk about the uncertainty. How can you do tax policy for two months?”

Congress Reaches Deal to Avoid Government Shutdown

On The Radar

Congress has reached an agreement to fund the federal government through Sept. 30 of next year — avoiding a government shutdown at midnight Friday — and was considering a deal for a short-term extension of a payroll tax cut and unemployment benefits to American workers. While a final deal on the payroll package continued to elude negotiators on Thursday, congressional leaders struck a less partisan tone than in days before and expressed optimism that a deal could be reached.