Related Content: Afghanistan

Attack May Derail Effort to Force Taliban Into Talks

On The Radar

The outrage from the back-to-back episodes of the Koran burning and the killing on Sunday of at least 16 Afghan civilians imperils what the Obama administration once saw as an orderly plan for 2012: to speed the training of Afghan forces so that they can take the lead in combat missions, all while drawing the Taliban into negotiations to end more than a decade of constant war.
Read More

Gen. John Allen Stands by U.S. Apology for Koran Burning

On The Radar

Gen. John Allen, the top U.S. commander in Afghanistan, said today he does not regret the apologies he and President Obama issued for the Koran burning incident, arguing that the move -- rare for a U.S. commander in chief -- was the right thing to do and that it had saved American lives.
Read More

U.S. Commander in Afghanistan – “We owe them” the Apology

On The Radar

GENERAL ALLEN: “WE OWE THEM” THE APOLOGY…Martha RADDATZ is the only journalist – print or broadcast – to travel with General John Allen, the Commander of U.S. and allied forces in Afghanistan. It’s obviously timely – coming in the aftermath of the Koran burnings and killings of six U.S. soldiers.
Read More

Strife Spurs Rethinking of Afghan Mission

On The Radar

As violence continued Monday in Afghanistan over the accidental burning of Qurans by U.S. troops last week, American military officials and analysts are beginning to question whether the United States needs to change its mission of training Afghan soldiers and police, a key plank of President Obama's withdrawal strategy.
Read More

February 24, 2012: Rick Santorum; Super Tuesday; Republican Primary; Unrest in Afghanistan post Quran burnings

Weekly Show

Rick Santorum is the main target in the GOP race as 13 states prepare to vote between now and Super Tuesday. Plus, international leaders meet in Tunisia to prevent more bloodshed in Syria. And unrest continues in Afghanistan after the burning of Qurans. Joining Gwen: Michael Duffy, TIME Magazine; Jeanne Cummings, Bloomberg News; Nancy Youssef, McClatchy; Yochi Dreazen, National Journal.

Koran Burning in Afghanistan Fuels Bloody New Attacks on U.S. Forces

On The Radar

The deaths of a pair of American soldiers in Afghanistan Thursday highlights the bloody intersection of two dangerous aspects of the long war there: the growing Afghan fury over the burning of Korans and the continued killings of Western troops by their Afghan counterparts. An Afghan soldier shot and killed the U.S. soldiers at an outpost in eastern Afghanistan’s Nangarhar Province and then, according to a U.S. official familiar with the matter, fled into the large crowd of demonstrators outside the base.

Afghanistan Protests: U.S. Embassy on Lock Down

On The Radar

An accidental burning of Qurans led to Anti-U.S. protests.

U.S. Forces Burn Old Copies of the Koran

On The Radar

Officials claim it was a misunderstanding when the holy books were discarded.

Panetta Surprises Afghans, NATO With Earlier Date for End of Combat Mission

On The Radar

Defense Secretary Leon Panetta’s comment while en route to a NATO conference in Brussels -- that the U.S. would end its combat mission in Afghanistan in 2013, a year earlier than thought -- surprised key U.S. allies, alarmed many Afghans, and forced the White House to spend more than a day trying to walk it back.
Read More from National Journal

White House Scrambles to Ease Fallout from Panetta's Afghanistan Comments

On The Radar

The Obama administration scrambled Thursday to tamp down the fallout out from Defense Secretary Leon Panetta's surprise announcement that the United States would end its combat role in Afghanistan a year earlier than expected — a revelation that heightened confusion over U.S. strategy and stoked Afghan distrust of American intentions.
Read More