Related Content: Barack Obama

An Idea Whose Time Has Come

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It doesn’t really matter whether the substance of what Joe Biden said last Sunday about gay marriage was so very different from what his boss, Barack Obama, had said about the subject in the past (and there’s good evidence that it was not). What matters is the way that Biden said he was “absolutely comfortable” with same-sex marriage, which made what Obama had said before—that his own views were “evolving”—look too cute by half.

Obama Campaign Pushes the Issue of Gay Marriage

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Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. apologized to President Obama for hastening him into an endorsement of same-sex marriage, several people briefed on the exchange said Thursday, even as the White House sought to capitalize in the campaign on Mr. Obama’s long-awaited expression of support.

Same-Sex Marriage Support Shows Pace of Social Change Accelerating

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When Bill Clinton was president, he waited until almost 1 in the morning in 1996 to sign a bill defining marriage as the union of a man and a woman. He did not like it, but was unwilling to veto it 45 days before an election. Sixteen years later, President Obama endorsed same-sex marriage, a journey reflecting not just his own personal “evolution,” but also the dizzying pace of social change in an age of technology.

The Big Straddle: Why Compromise Can Be Hazardous to One’s Political Health

Gwen's Take

“There’s nothing in the middle of the road but yellow stripes and dead armadillos.”

Jim Hightower, a committed liberal and former Texas Agriculture Commissioner, liked to say this so much that he finally used it as a title for a book.

I was reminded of this tart assessment this week as I watched two skilled politicians attempt to negotiate a growing chasm opening under their feet. One of them, Indiana GOP Sen. Richard Lugar, slipped and fell. The other, President Obama, appeared to leap nimbly to the other side of the sinkhole just before it swallowed him up.

Obama Evolves on Gay Marriage

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President Obama's announcement Wednesday that he was done "evolving" and now supports same-sex marriage was, in retrospect, inevitable. Vice President Joe Biden made it so Sunday, when he remarked almost casually that he had grown "comfortable" with gay marriage. Biden's comfort level made Obama the nation's least comfortable politician, tied up in a knot of convoluted positions that he had hoped voters on both sides would overlook.

Obama’s Gay Marriage Turnabout Forced Public by Biden

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At a fundraiser with gay activists in New York last June, the day before state legislators passed a same-sex marriage law, President Barack Obama considered the choice they were making. He concluded he’d almost certainly have voted “yes” too. Conversations with staff, family, friends and supporters also moved him in that direction.

Putin to Skip Group of 8 Session, Delaying Postelection Meeting With Obama

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Russia’s newly inaugurated president, Vladimir V. Putin, will not attend a summit meeting of world leaders in Maryland next week, the White House said on Wednesday, postponing until June the much-anticipated first meeting of President Obama and Mr. Putin as the leaders of their respective countries.

The Audacity of Evolution

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Joe Biden has such power over evolution he might make an amoeba get up and walk. Three days ago the vice president announced on Meet the Press that he supported same-sex couples getting married. Wednesday, President Obama announced that after a many-year evolution on the issue, he believed the same thing. The first African-American president became the first ever to announce his support for same-sex marriage. This is a landmark civil rights moment that happened awfully fast.

PBS NewsHour: The Politics of Gay Marriage: Biden Remarks Rekindle Culture War

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When Vice President Joe Biden said he now believes same-sex marriages should be protected under law, it touched off a new round of political culture wars. Gwen Ifill hosts a debate between Brian Brown of the National Organization for Marriage and gay rights advocate Richard Socarides.

Obama launches campaign against Romney, but his real opponent is the economy

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President Obama formally launched his reelection campaign here Saturday with some old favorites, from “fired up, ready to go” to a closing bow to “hope and change.” But almost everything else about the day spoke to the differences between his first and second runs for the president. The president used his rallies to try to begin to disqualify Mitt Romney. Yet the coming election is still more about him than his probable Republican rival.