Related Content: Barack Obama

Panel Fails to Reach Deal on Plan for Deficit Reduction

On The Radar

Leaders of the Congressional committee charged with finding at least $1.2 trillion in deficit reductions conceded on Monday that panel members had failed, setting up what is likely to be a yearlong political fight over the automatic cuts to a broad range of military and domestic programs that would go into effect starting in 2013 as a result of their inability to reach a deal. Speaking an hour after the committee’s failure was announced by its leaders in an e-mail statement, President Obama promised to veto any legislation that seeks to avoid the automatic cuts.

Obama Weighed Risks of Engagement, and Decided to Give Voters the Final Say

On The Radar

In remaining aloof from the special deficit committee in Congress even as it collapsed on Monday, President Obama showed his calculation more clearly than ever before: Republicans will never agree to raise taxes on the wealthy to balance any spending cuts, so let the voters decide. Congress could still reach a bipartisan compromise in the next month, or next year, to avoid the threat of automatic spending cuts, especially in military programs, in 2013.

The President's Agenda

On The Radar

For Alan Krueger, recently confirmed by the Senate to be chairman of the White House Council of Economic Advisers, this is a second tour in the Obama administration. In 2009-10, he served as the Treasury's top economist. Last year he returned to Princeton University, where he is a professor of economics. But President Obama called him back this fall to join his economic team, calling particularly on Mr. Krueger's expertise on labor-market issues at a time of persistently high unemployment.

DC Shooting Suspect Could Be Threat to Obama, Police Say

On The Radar

ABC News has learned authorities are increasingly concerned that a man sought in connection with a bizarre shooting incident on the Washington Mall last week may pose a threat to President Obama.

Super Committee, Super Lie

On The Radar

When I left the White House beat to cover Congress, I told people what the biggest difference was between the two beats. People in the White House and Congress lie to you, I would say; the difference is that on the Hill it’s not the same lie told by the same seven people. That was true until the super committee was created. Now, instead of politicians lying to their constituents and reporters, they are lying to themselves. Not rationalizing, or trimming the truth, or speaking in euphemisms. Lying. Bald. Faced. Lying.

Costume Shot Unnecessary, Obama Says

On The Radar

Is the “silly shirts” photo of Asia-Pacific leaders now history? To the chagrin of White House photographers but the relief of the 21 leaders at the annual Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation forum that took place over the weekend, President Obama, as the host this year, packed away for good the two-decade tradition of having the group pose for a “family photo” in some garb representative of the host country.

Romney campaign: Obama has "Mitt-obsession"

On The Radar

Mitt Romney can’t exactly say himself that his path to the Republican nomination seems inevitable. So his campaign is phrasing it another way: Obama and the Democrats are singularly focused, to the point of obsession, on Mitt Romney, to the absolute exclusion of every other candidate in the race.

Justices' review of health care law adds to election tumult

On The Radar

The Supreme Court's announcement Monday that it will hear challenges to the Obama-sponsored health care law opens the most important chapter in the legal battle over the law, amid the tumult of election-year politics.

Supreme Court to hear dispute on health care law

On The Radar

The Supreme Court announced Monday that it will hear a dispute testing the constitutionality of the Obama-sponsored health care overhaul, a move that opens the most important chapter in the legal battle over the law.

On Asia-Pacific trip, Obama's focus is on China

On The Radar

At virtually every point in President Obama's  nine-day Asia-Pacific trip, he is expected to deliver a message aimed squarely at China: that the U.S. will recommit to the region and serve as a reliable counterweight to Beijing's growing military and economic might.