Related Content: Senate

Senate Rejects GOP Attempt to Advance Keystone XL

On The Radar

With gas prices becoming a high-octane campaign issue, the Democratic-led Senate beat back a Republican effort to advance the controversial Keystone XL oil pipeline project. Thursday’s vote to attach the project to a must-pass transportation bill failed 56 to 42, with 11 Democrats joining Republicans to support the measure. Sixty votes were needed for passage.
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Senate Rejects Effort to Roll Back Birth Control Rule

On The Radar

The Democratic-controlled U.S. Senate today narrowly rejected an amendment by Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., to circumvent a controversial Obama administration rule requiring employers to provide contraceptives. The Obama rule has provoked a passionate election year debate about the line between religious freedom and women's health.
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Sen. Lieberman Cites Dr. Seuss’ Moose

On The Radar

Senators often quote weighty historical figures to back up their arguments on the Senate floor. Alexis de Tocqueville is a big favorite. So is Alexander Hamilton. The late Sen. Robert Byrd (D., W. Va.), was famous for citing Roman orators that few of his colleagues had heard of. Then there’s Dr. Seuss.
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Bucking Senate, Obama Appoints Consumer Chief

On The Radar

President Obama touched off a fierce election-year confrontation with Congressional Republicans on Wednesday, defying their deep opposition to appoint Richard Cordray as director of a new consumer protection agency and fill three labor board vacancies.
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Nebraska Sen. Ben Nelson to Retire

On The Radar

Democratic Sen. Ben Nelson of Nebraska has told supporters he will not seek re-election. His decision was first reported by Politico. In his statement, Nelson said: "Simply put: It is time to move on." Nelson, 70, was facing a tough fight for a third term. His retirement improves the GOP's chances of picking up the Nebraska Senate seat the Democrat has held since 2000, and it enhances the odds of a Republican takeover of the Senate in 2012.
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Lawmakers Reach Deal on Payroll Tax

On The Radar

The ice cracked under House Speaker John Boehner on Thursday. A deal to quiet a bruising political eruption over the payroll tax finally took shape -- after relentless criticism from within GOP ranks that House Republicans had dug themselves knee-deep in quicksand. After days of thrashing and teeth-gnashing, Republican Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell offered a way out of the mess with a statement underscoring similarities between the measures in the two chambers, rather than differences.

In Case You Were Wondering: We Have Been Here Before

Gwen's Take

“Politics is politics” House Speaker John Boehner opined Thursday, as he stepped before the cameras to explain why he would not back down in the payroll tax fight House Republicans have been waging with the Senate.

Seldom have truer words been spoken. And it was politics at work when -- even as Boehner was speaking -- his counterpart on the other side of the Capitol, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, was busy bailing water out of the boat.

Obama Gets a Lift From Tax Battle With Republicans

On The Radar

After a long stretch of high unemployment, legislative turmoil and, in turn, slipping public approval, President Obama seemed to regain his political footing this week with the help of House Republicans, whose handling of a standoff over payroll taxes had even leading conservatives accusing them of bungling the politically charged issue.
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Obama, Senate Democrats Rally for Benefits Extension

On The Radar

President Obama and Senate Democrats appealed to House Republicans on Wednesday to return to Washington and approve a two-month extension of benefits for American workers before they expire Dec. 31. The House GOP remains opposed to a short-term patch despite mounting opposition to the strategy, even from within the party.
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Obama Scolds House GOP Over Payroll Tax Stalemate

On The Radar

President Obama turned up the heat on House Republicans Tuesday afternoon, urging them to rethink their opposition to a Senate-approved bill that would extend the payroll tax holiday for at least two more months next year. Shortly after House conservatives voted Tuesday to rebuke the Senate and risk raising the payroll tax in January, the president grabbed his spokesman’s podium to deliver his own message to lawmakers.
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