Related Content: John Dickerson

May 11, 2012

Weekly Show

What’s the political fallout of President Obama’s support for same-sex marriage? Plus, longtime Senator Richard Lugar, R-Ind., lost his party's primary. What does that mean for moderate republicans and incumbents? Also, the double-agent al-Qaeda plotter. Joining Gwen: Major Garrett, National Journal; John Dickerson, Slate Magazine & CBS News; Susan Davis, USA Today; Pierre Thomas, ABC News.

What Kind of Kid Was Mitt Romney?

Essential Reads

One of the many tensions in evaluating presidential candidates is that we don't want to disqualify them based on the stupidity of their youth. George W. Bush's blanket denial that "when I was young and irresponsible I was young and irresponsible" seems like a good rule. On the other hand, we want to know who these candidates are who seek to lead us (especially when they spend so much time offering us synthetic versions of themselves).

The Audacity of Evolution

Essential Reads

Joe Biden has such power over evolution he might make an amoeba get up and walk. Three days ago the vice president announced on Meet the Press that he supported same-sex couples getting married. Wednesday, President Obama announced that after a many-year evolution on the issue, he believed the same thing. The first African-American president became the first ever to announce his support for same-sex marriage. This is a landmark civil rights moment that happened awfully fast.

The Most Important Voters of 2012

Essential Reads

Ohio Republican Senate candidate Josh Mandel is 34, but he looks 19. He's not clean-cut—he's freshly shorn. So when the young State Treasurer explains that he's going to beat incumbent Democratic Sen. Sherrod Brown by winning over working-class voters who spend their day with equipment that is hot, heavy, and dirty, it seems like a long shot.

Hispanic Leaders Divided on President Obama

Essential Reads

Because Hispanics, the fastest-growing segment of the US population, will play a big role in November's presidential election, leaders from the Hispanic community reinforced the notion that they are not a monolithic voting bloc.

April 27, 2012

Weekly Show

As the campaigns look ahead, Mitt Romney targets Barack Obama, but he is targeting youth voters. The Supreme Court hears arguments on Arizona immigration law. Also, a year after Osama bin Laden’s death, balancing terrorism and civil liberties. Joining Gwen: John Dickerson, Slate Magazine/CBS News; Alexis Simendinger, RealClearPolitics; Pete Williams, NBC News; James Kitfield, National Journal.

 

Can You Be Honest With Me?

Essential Reads

Expecting presidential candidates to be candid with voters is such a quaint idea you'd expect to find it on Pinterest. There it is, next to the adorable confectionery and wedding dog photos. Well, I like quaint, and if you also like a Dr. Seuss saying stenciled on an ambiguous decorative item, then join me on my search for candor in the 2012 presidential campaign. I need your help.

At Least He Didn’t Call Him Moneybags

On The Radar

Yesterday President Obama said he "wasn't born with a silver spoon in his mouth." This line was widely interpreted as a not-so-subtle dig at Mitt Romney, the wealthy son of a wealthy father. At first glance, that seemed plausible, though perhaps too subtle. The president's campaign would like you to think Romney was born with silver tea, soup, demitasse, grapefruit, and runcible spoons—not to mention that funny silver ladle we use just on Thanksgiving—in his mouth. But upon second look, the president wasn't talking about his Republican challenger. He was just talking.

From the Vault: 2008 Cleveland Town Hall

Vault Show

Ohio was considered one of the most important swing state of the 2008 presidential race and is gearing up to be just as important in 2012. This week, as Washington Week hosts our first-ever Electronic Town Hall, with audiences in Ohio and Oregon, we ask if the issues that were important to voters in 2008 different than those in 2012? Take a look back at our Road Show from Cleveland, Ohio in 2008.

The Bubble Wars

On The Radar

One way to think about the 2012 presidential campaign is as a battle between two houses: Barack Obama's White House and Mitt Romney's San Diego house. The Romney campaign would like to make Obama a prisoner to 1600 Pennsylvania Ave., turning every perk and privilege of the presidency into a sign that he is far removed from the people he is supposed to lead, especially anyone struggling in this economy.