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Romney Newtered

On The Radar

South Carolina went “Grandiose.” Newt Gingrich, who embraced that word when it was used to describe him, won the Republican primary handily today with around 40 percent of the vote. Mitt Romney, who had been ahead by double digits in polls after the New Hampshire primary, received only 27 percent. Given Gingrich's overwhelming victory, it may be difficult for him to find a historical figure important enough to compare himself to.

The Brawl

On The Radar

Newt Gingrich said "No." Mitt Romney said "Maybe." And Rick Santorum said everything better than he has in any other debate. The last Republican debate before Saturday’s South Carolina primary—and the first with just four candidates—was perhaps the most lively of the 17 that have come during this campaign.
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Gingrich Comes Back—Again

On The Radar

Mitt Romney and Newt Gingrich are both trying to help South Carolina voters imagine what will happen if Gingrich captures the nomination. In the Gingrich model, he crushes President Obama in the fall 2012 debates, wins a huge victory on Election Day, and prepares the country for fundamental change. In the Romney vision, the undisciplined Gingrich clatters into the fall surrounded by the wreckage of his campaign: His oddball comments set off a series of press feeding frenzies, and he manages to squander a huge Republican opportunity to regain the White House.

Good Enough

On The Radar

For the last week, Mitt Romney has called himself "landslide Romney," repeating a joke from John McCain about his eight-vote victory in the Iowa caucuses. The title fits a little better now. He won the New Hampshire primary by a handy 13 points with 37 percent of the vote. In the much-watched fight for runner-up, Ron Paul got that "real nice second place" he'd been predicting, with 24 percent of the vote, and Jon Huntsman finished third with 17 percent—to the disappointment of New York magazine editors but few Republican voters.

The Great Republican Humor Crisis of 2012

On The Radar

When John McCain joined Mitt Romney on the campaign trail this week, he brought with him something unfamiliar in this year's race: laughter. Following former New Hampshire Gov. John Sununu at a rally on Wednesday, McCain said it reminded him of his favorite joke about governors: "There were two inmates in the chow line in the state prison and one of them turned to the other and said the food was a lot better in here when you were governor.”

January 6, 2012

Weekly Show

This week, we’re on the ground in Manchester, New Hampshire to preview the primaries. After a close finish in Iowa, will Mitt Romney stay ahead of the pack in the Granite State? Joining Gwen: Dan Balz,  Washington Post; John Dickerson, Slate Magazine and CBS News; Julianna Goldman, Bloomberg News; John Harwood, CNBC and The New York Times.
 

On the Road in New Hampshire

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The Mitt and McCain Show

On The Radar

John McCain hugged Mitt Romney today as he endorsed his campaign. Four years ago, he wanted to hug Romney long enough to stop his breathing. The bitter rivals from the 2008 campaign now have a common enemy: Barack Obama. So while McCain once accused Romney of Chamberlain-like weakness in Iraq, the two have now aligned to bash the incumbent for his handling of the withdrawal from that country.

Did Bachmann Just Save Romney?

On The Radar

There have been so many debates during the Republican preseason that it was hard to believe the one hosted by Fox News in Sioux City, Iowa, was the last one before the voting begins. Ratings have been strong, and commentary has been endless: You can imagine a network trying to squeeze in just one more—are you free on Christmas Eve, Governor?
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America’s Greatest Attack Politician

On The Radar

For a candidate who talks about being nice to his opponents, Newt Gingrich sure knows how to make them suffer. Today, when Mitt Romney suggested Gingrich return the $1.6 million he was paid by Freddie Mac, the former speaker shot back that Romney should return the money he earned “from bankrupting companies and laying off employees” as a venture capitalist. When asked about Michele Bachmann's critique of his immigration position, former college professor Gingrich compared her to a dumb student .