Related Content: economy

Clint Eastwood Gives America a Pep Talk

On The Radar

Did the first Obama re-election ad run during the Super Bowl? You might have missed it since the president wasn't even mentioned. It was a Chrysler ad, although even that wasn’t obvious. Instead, more than 111 million viewers were greeted by that tough-talking American icon Clint Eastwood as he delivered what amounted to a locker room speech to the country.
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Voice of the Voters: Colorado Youth

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Washington Week partnered with Colorado Mesa University ahead of the Colorado caucus to find out what issues young voters are focusing on as they evaluate the candidates hoping to become president. Student Tess Matsukawa reports.

Happy New Year

On The Radar

Is the jobs recovery finally for real? It certainly feels that way. Before getting into the caveats, let's look at January's solid employment report. Non-farm employment jumped 243,000, or 0.2%, from December, the best in nine months. The unemployment rate fell to 8.3%, a three-year low, from 8.5%.
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Fact Check: Romney on the Recession

On The Radar

Mitt Romney is back to saying that President Obama “made it worse” – the recession, that is – but his charge remains factually challenged. Accepting the endorsement of Donald Trump, a former rival for the Republican presidential nomination, in Las Vegas on Thursday, Mr. Romney said of the president: “He’s frequently telling us that he did not cause the recession, and that’s true. But he made it worse.”
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Voice of the Voters: Nevada Youth

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Nevada has the highest unemployment rate in the country and a high rate of foreclosures. How is this affecting the youth vote heading into the upcoming GOP Caucus? Washington Week partnered with the University of Nevada, Reno to find out what problems students think should be at the forefront and what issues are unique to Nevada. Student Rebecca Kitchen reports.

Who Cares About the Poor?

On The Radar

Mitt Romney is now being protected by the Secret Service. Unfortunately for him, they were not in a position to jump in front of his comments Wednesday morning. The day after his Florida triumph, Romney told CNN: “I’m not concerned about the very poor. We have a safety net there. If it needs repair, I’ll fix it. I’m not concerned about the very rich, they’re doing just fine. I’m concerned about the very heart of America, the 90 percent, 95 percent of Americans who right now are struggling.”

Romney and the Poor: An Unforced Error by the GOP Front-Runner

On The Radar

After a week of near-perfect campaign execution that culminated in a blowout victory over his top rival, Mitt Romney awoke in Florida ready to tighten his grip on the Republican presidential nomination and turn his attention and rhetoric toward the general election. Instead, Romney committed what in tennis is known as an unforced error, setting off on a mission of declaring solidarity with the middle class but ending up in a thicket of class politics that did everything but describe America's poor as coddled.

Obama Announces Refinancing Plan

On The Radar

President Barack Obama announced a fresh bid Wednesday to revive the housing market by letting millions of homeowners refinance their mortgages, Laura Meckler reports on the News Hub.
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Obama Doesn’t Name Names in Campaign

On The Radar

President Barack Obama doesn’t utter Mitt Romney’s name in speeches and public remarks. He just uses the Republican front-runner’s words. “It is wrong for anyone to suggest that the only option for struggling responsible homeowners is to sit and wait for the housing market to hit bottom,” Obama said yesterday in Falls Church, Virginia, announcing his latest housing proposal.
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Can You Hear Me Now?

On The Radar

Japan holds the modern record for years spent with interest rates at zero; they were on the floor from 2001 to 2006. America is on track to break that record. Having cut its short-term rate to near zero in late 2008, the Federal Reserve said on January 25th it will probably stay there “at least through late 2014”, more than a year longer than its previous guidance.
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