Related Content: economy

Euro Central Bank Might Consider Bond Purchases

On The Radar

In his Capital Corner segment, David Wessel points out European leaders must address the imminent danger of economic collapse or they may face 'a Lehman moment.' Meanwhile, the ECB indicated it may consider buying bonds to prop up economies.

GOP governors worry Obama might escape his woes

On The Radar

Republican governors, who swept to big victories last year, think President Barack Obama faces huge political obstacles. But they're hardly brimming with confidence about the 2012 election. Meeting this week in Florida, GOP governors and their advisers fret that their party could lose its advantage on the tax-cut issue by appearing too eager to protect the rich.

If I Were King ...

On The Radar

When a presidential candidate makes a promise, it's always useful to ask: How are you going to pull that off? There usually isn't an answer. Health care will be repealed, the budget balanced, and 15-minute brownies made in 10. Newt Gingrich is the only candidate who talks about how he would actually enact some of the promises he makes and the changes he would bring to the office of the presidency. Whether you agree with him or not, this is a useful and laudable thing.

Central Banks Swing Into Action; Encouraging, Terrifying

On The Radar

Central bankers around the world are very, very worried about Europe, and they’re starting to do something about it. This is equal parts terrifying and encouraging. That’s the critical takeaway from the liquidity injection – a fancy way of saying, turning up the spigot on global lending – embarked upon on Wednesday by the Federal Reserve, the European Central Bank, and four other central banks from around the globe. The coordinated effort will make it cheaper for foreign banks to borrow U.S.

A Crude Hit to the Recovery

On The Radar

The U.S. economy missed out on creating up to a quarter-million jobs this year because it lacked the infrastructure to capitalize on a rare divergence in global oil prices, a National Journal analysis shows. Simply put, American consumers paid a historically high premium for their gasoline. The economy suffered for it.

States face bleak economic forecast, report says

On The Radar

States are caught in a fiscal vise as weak economic growth, dwindling federal help and increasing appeals from hard-pressed local governments squeeze their budgets. Things have improved since the worst of the recession, but states still face a dire fiscal situation, according to a report to be released Tuesday by the National Governors Association (NGA) and the National Association of State Budget Officers (NASBO).

Obama's Mini-Initiative: Shop "Small" on Saturday

On The Radar

President Obama is trying to persuade voters that he supports America's smallest businesses, one jar of blueberry jam at a time. Small is in. Small is sweet. Small, let's face it, is comprehensible. When global problems are so migraine-inducing, a Cabinet full of high-powered micro-shoppers could become bigger than the sum of its itsy-bitsy parts.

U.S. Companies Add Workers Abroad, Cut at Home

On The Radar

U.S.-based multinational corporations added 1.5 million workers to their payrolls in Asia and the Pacific during the 2000s, and 477,500 workers in Latin America, while cutting payrolls at home by 864,000. David Wessel has details on The News Hub.

Supercommittee announces failure in effort to tame debt

On The Radar

A special congressional committee created to try to curb the national debt abandoned its work and conceded failure Monday, the latest setback in a long effort by Washington to overcome ideological differences and stem the rising tide of red ink. In a joint statement issued hours before a midnight deadline, the Democratic and Republican leaders of the panel said that they were “deeply disappointed” by their inability to reach an agreement and that they hope for progress in the months ahead.

Panel Fails to Reach Deal on Plan for Deficit Reduction

On The Radar

Leaders of the Congressional committee charged with finding at least $1.2 trillion in deficit reductions conceded on Monday that panel members had failed, setting up what is likely to be a yearlong political fight over the automatic cuts to a broad range of military and domestic programs that would go into effect starting in 2013 as a result of their inability to reach a deal. Speaking an hour after the committee’s failure was announced by its leaders in an e-mail statement, President Obama promised to veto any legislation that seeks to avoid the automatic cuts.