Related Content: Washington

Behind Closed Doors

Essential Reads

The most encouraging news in Washington in ages was the word that Barack Obama and John Boehner were talking—by themselves, and to each other—about how to avoid the series of automatic tax increases and spending cuts that could send the country over the so-called fiscal cliff. Boehner went to see the president at the White House last Sunday for their first solo meeting since the November election.

Demystifying the fiscal impasse that is vexing Washington

Essential Reads

Many Americans must be wondering: What is all this about a “fiscal cliff”? And why did it receive so little attention during the presidential campaign?

Bush Dips a Toe Back Into Washington

Essential Reads

In the three years since he left office, former President George W. Bush has largely stayed out of the political arena. He has spent his time mapping out his library, making speeches, hosting injured veterans for Texas bicycle rides and making clear how glad he is to be out of the nation’s capital.

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Death of Bipartisanship Has Killed the Washington Deal

On The Radar

Every time there is divided government in Washington, there is a revival — among elite journalists, think tank commentators and respectable politicians of all stripes — of a cherished idea about how business should get done in the nation’s capital: Get the most responsible adults of both parties in one room, shoo away the cameras and microphones, and don’t let the two sides come out until they have cut a deal on the most pressing problem of the day.
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Republican Rivals Unleash Broadside on Paul in Iowa

On The Radar

The Republican presidential candidates sharpened their criticism of Representative Ron Paul on Tuesday in an effort to keep his support from growing among voters who are frustrated with government and may be inclined to send a message to the Washington establishment by supporting him in the Iowa caucuses. Newt Gingrich said Mr. Paul, of Texas, was a “protest” candidate, and that he could not vote for the congressman if he won the party’s nomination. In a television interview, Mr. Gingrich, the former House speaker, declared that Mr.

Hate Washington? Join The Club

Gwen's Take

Welcome to my hometown. There are few places in the world that people hate so much, yet expend such extraordinary effort trying to get to.

Myself, I find much to love about Washington. The monuments are pretty. The green spaces are well-manicured. The museums are astounding (and mostly free). And it is just Southern enough to produce good food and good people.

But if there is one thing that never seems to change, it is that the rest of the country has come to hate the caricature the city has become.

While Washington Fights, Your Taxes Set to Rise

On The Radar

WSJ's David Wessel offers analysis of Washington's battle over payroll tax reductions as Social Security tax increases are slated to kick in at the end of December.

 

All The King's Horses And All The King's Men

Gwen's Take

In the fine tradition of the well-executed post mortem, we now find ourselves in the season of the "tick tock" -- the well-reported explanations of how a big story unfolded.

We have been treated to the finest of the genre in the days since the President was finally able to put ink to paper and sign the much wrangled- over legislation to raise the nation's debt limit.

On the Radar: February 22, 2010

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PBS NewsHour: Public Anger Continues to Hammer Congressional Incumbents

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February 16, 2010

As voter polls continue to show a rising tide of resentment for congressional incumbents, Indiana's Evan Bayh became the latest official to announce he will not seek re-election. Stuart Rothenberg of The Rothenberg Political Report and The Hotline's Amy Walter assess the political mood this campaign season.