Related Content: Supreme Court

March 29, 2013

Weekly Show

The Supreme Court heard two same-sex marriage cases this week. We look at the similarities and differences between these cases and the shift in  public opinion on same-sex marriage alongside some lawmakers’ political considerations.  Also, Obama urges Congress to pass gun legislation. Joining Doyle McManus of the Los Angeles Times: Joan Biskupic, Reuters; Pete Williams, NBC News; John Harwood, CNBC and New York Times; Dan Balz, Washington Post.

March 1, 2013

Weekly Show

We look at why the White House and Congress could not reach a deal to avoid the sequester before the March 1 deadline.  Plus, the potential economic impact of mandatory federal spending cuts.  Also, we analyze the Supreme Court case that challenges a key part of the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Joining Gwen: Joan Biskupic, Reuters; Gloria Borger, CNN; and David Wessel, Wall Street Journal.  

 

Gwen’s Take | Inside the Supreme Court with Sonia Sotomayor

Gwen's Take

There are few places in Washington as grand as the Supreme Court. The staircases sweep; the marble columns soar, and the carved archways inside guide visitors down hushed hallways. The chamber itself, with its velvet drapes, elevated bench and rich history, makes you drop your voice to a whisper once you’re inside.

Gun-Control Converts Could Pave Way to New Laws

Essential Reads

Sen. Robert Casey, D-Pa., does not shy away from the “pro-gun Democrat” label. He has a B-plus rating with the National Rifle Association, a score docked only because he supported the confirmation of Supreme Court Justices Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan, and he represents a state with a strong hunting tradition.

Congress Has Outsized Influence Over Obama's Cabinet

Essential Reads

Robert Bork's 1987 nomination to the Supreme Court, and the uproar over his ideology that ultimately led to his defeat, forever changed the process by which the Senate confirms judges. In the 25 years that have followed Bork's nomination, the two parties have fought increasingly bitter battles over high court picks in an effort to tilt the third branch of government their way. In 2002, the Oxford English Dictionary added the verb "to bork" -- to systematically defame or vilify a person, especially in the mass media -- to their lexicon.

The Marriage Plot: Inside This Year's Epic Campaign for Gay Equality

Essential Reads

On May 9, President Obama sat for an interview in the White House with the ABC News anchor Robin Roberts. Both of them knew what she'd been summoned there to discuss, and Roberts didn't waste any time. "So, Mr. President," she said, "are you still opposed to same-sex marriage?"

US Supreme Court To Take Up Same-Sex Marriage Issue

Essential Reads

The U.S. Supreme Court agreed Friday to take its first serious look at the issue of gay marriage, granting review of California's ban on same-sex marriage and of a federal law that defines marriage as only the legal union of a man and a woman.

Analysis: Obama may now seek to make deeper mark on high court

Essential Reads

President Barack Obama's election victory on Tuesday may give him the  opportunity to deepen his liberal imprint on the U.S. Supreme Court.

Will acceptance of gays by high court influence rulings?

Essential Reads

A tall, hulking man in his late 70s, William Rehnquist, then chief justice of the United States, crawled down on all fours to say hello to the two little girls who had scurried under the table when he approached at a luncheon.

Our Messy Liberties, Then And Now

Gwen's Take

On the Fourth of July, I poured a cup of coffee and started my day reading the Declaration of Independence at my kitchen table. Out loud.

You should try it. It’s one thing to think you know what it says. It’s another thing to hear the words come back at you in your own voice.

We all remember the opening phrases -- “When in the course of human events...” and “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal….” But how many of us recall how in-your-face the rest of the document is?