Related Content: budget

February 17, 2012

Weekly Show

As the GOP presidential primary race between Rick Santorum and Mitt Romney tightens, the panel previews the Arizona and Michigan primaries. Plus, President Barack Obama’s proposed budget, a deal to extend payroll tax cuts, and tensions over Iran’s nuclear program. Joining Gwen: Karen Tumulty, Washington Post; Jackie Calmes, New York Times; Susan Davis, USA Today; Martha Raddatz, ABC News.

 

Another Doomed Exercise

On The Radar

Back in 2009 Barack Obama’s first budget called for repealing his predecessor’s tax cuts on the rich, eliminating tax breaks for multinationals and boosting the tax rate on capital gains. A year later Mr Obama repeated those proposals, and added new ones: no more breaks for fossil-fuel producers and a “financial crisis responsibility fee” on banks.
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Obama Budget Optimistic on Economic Growth, Again

On The Radar

President Obama’s economists are nothing if not optimistic. In the fiscal year 2013 presidential budget request, they’ve once again forecast higher future growth than their private-sector peers – about a half-point of gross domestic product growth more, per year, than the 45 economists included in the Philadelphia Fed’s Survey of Professional Forecasters.
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Heaviest 2013 Defense Budget Cuts Would Fall on Troops

On The Radar

As the Pentagon sought to show Monday that it had made tough spending decisions in its fiscal 2013 budget proposal, the brunt of the reductions would fall on U.S. ground troops, which face job losses, modest pay raises and increased health care costs while serving in a smaller force.
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Obama Budget is Preview of Election Battle

On The Radar

President Obama's 2013 budget, scheduled for release Monday, offers a preview of the November election as both parties angle to refine the vision they hope to sell to voters. Obama's plan and the House Republicans' answer, due in the spring, are aimed as much at offering voters a choice as at promoting policies destined for enactment.
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Contraception Debate Drowns Out Budget Talk

On The Radar

The new White House chief of staff, Jacob J. Lew, made the rounds of the Sunday talk shows to discuss the budget that President Obama is to release on Monday, but instead he was forced repeatedly to defend the administration’s effort to guarantee that insurers cover birth control for women in the face of criticism from religious groups.
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Panetta: U.S. to Wind Down Combat Mission in Afghanistan Next Year

On The Radar

Defense Secretary Leon Panetta said that the U.S.-led NATO coalition would end its combat role in Afghanistan next year, the clearest indication yet that the Obama administration is accelerating its plans to wind down the long and unpopular Afghan war. “Hopefully by mid- to the latter part of 2013, we’ll be able to make a transition from a combat role to a training, advise, and assist role,” The Washington Post said Panetta told reporters accompanying him to Brussels.

White House to Release Budget Proposal Feb. 13

On The Radar

President Obama’s final budget proposal of his term, covering fiscal year 2013 and the decade beyond, will be released on Feb. 13, a week later than officials had previously indicated. The Office of Management and Budget notified reporters of the timing on Monday in an e-mail without explanation, though a spokesman said the extra time was needed “to finalize technical and programmatic decisions.” The administration had not committed to releasing the budget on Feb. 6, but that date had been talked about for weeks.

Obama's Modest Proposal on Defense

On The Radar

As he unveiled his administration's new blueprint for U.S. defense strategy last week, President Obama sought to vaccinate himself against charges that he was gutting the nation's military. Even after the strategy is fully implemented, he said, "the defense budget will still be larger than it was at the end of the Bush administration."
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Shifts at Pentagon Reflect Dual Realities of Different Threats, Tighter Budgets

On The Radar

The Obama administration's high-profile rollout of its new military blueprint for the years ahead was designed to do two very different things: mark a decisive shift away from manpower-heavy counterinsurgencies like Afghanistan and shield the White House from Republican criticism over its plans for significant cuts to the Pentagon budget.
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