Related Content: budget

President Cuts Defense Spending

On The Radar

New strategy relies less on ground troops and more on naval forces, air power. 

Congress Reaches Deal to Avoid Government Shutdown

On The Radar

Congress has reached an agreement to fund the federal government through Sept. 30 of next year — avoiding a government shutdown at midnight Friday — and was considering a deal for a short-term extension of a payroll tax cut and unemployment benefits to American workers. While a final deal on the payroll package continued to elude negotiators on Thursday, congressional leaders struck a less partisan tone than in days before and expressed optimism that a deal could be reached.

Paul Ryan to Announce New Approach to Preserving Medicare

On The Radar

House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan, who has been castigated by Democrats and hailed by Republicans for his plan to privatize Medicare, will on Thursday unveil a new approach that would preserve the 46-year-old federal health program. Working with Democratic Sen. Ron Wyden (Ore.), the Wisconsin Republican is developing a framework that would offer traditional, government-run Medicare as an option for future retirees along with a variety of private plans.

GOP Tries To Reign In Spending On Jobless Benefits

On The Radar

One of the year-end fights going on in Congress is about unemployment insurance. Democrats want to extend benefits for people who have been out of work for a long time. Republicans say it's time to change the program and lower its cost. The Labor Department estimates that if Congress doesn't act soon, some 2.5 million people could stop receiving checks by March.

Inside Congress’s End-of-Session Follies

On The Radar

Faced with a House Republican bill that extends the payroll-tax holiday but doesn't raise taxes on millionaires, President Obama and Senate Democrats are considering financing the extension with budget cuts. And as House Republicans attempted an end-run around the effort by Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., to stall passage of a massive, almost $1 trillion spending package, White House communications director Dan Pfeiffer called for passage of another short-term funding measure.

Americans Reject Automatic US Budget Cuts: CNBC Survey

On The Radar

Americans split on almost every important issue facing Washington, but they agree on this much: Republicans and Democrats share blame for the failure of the Congressional "super committee," and the resulting automatic budget cuts are unacceptable.

Super-Committee Failure Forecasts Sequester Fight

On The Radar

The super committee’s failure to come up with $1.2 trillion in deficit-reduction measures has paved the way for an election-year battle by Republicans to rewrite the sequester rules and protect defense spending in the face of a White House veto threat. House Armed Services Chairman Buck McKeon, R-Calif., a vocal opponent to the sequester from the onset, said on Monday that he will introduce legislation in the coming days to prevent the cuts from taking effect in their current form.

Bernanke tells Congress to cut out the brinkmanship over budget

On The Radar

Ben S. Bernanke went to Congress on Tuesday with a message: Cut out the brinkmanship over tax and spending policy and slash budget deficits more than planned — but don’t do it so fast that it undermines economic growth.

March 4, 1994

Weekly Show

The House GOP included a balanced budget amendment as part of their "Cut, Cap and Balance" bill that is currently stalled in the democratic-controlled Senate. Balanced budget amendments have been proposed since 1936; the last was in 1997. On March 4, 1994, Washington Week discussed the Senate's failure to pass a balanced budget amendment, 63-37.

On the Radar: September 23, 2011

Legacy: On The Radar

House Republicans Regrouping on CR, Pondering Two Options
By Susan Davis and Major Garrett, National Journal
House Republicans will meet on Thursday afternoon to discuss their options to move forward on a short-term bill to fund the federal government that their party failed to pass a day earlier. Read more

Boehner Reckons With GOP Revolt
By Naftali Bendavid and Janet Hook, Wall Street Journal
House Speaker John Boehner took power in January promising a freewheeling and open style, rejecting the iron-fisted tactics used by earlier speakers. The embarrassing defeat of a routine spending bill this week that must be passed to avoid a government shutdown brought home the cost of his approach. Read more

Analysis: Perry, Romney defend records in forum
By Charles Babington, Associated Press
Rick Perry and Mitt Romney struggled with a simple reality in the latest GOP debate: Americans elect only experienced politicians as president, and Republicans nominate only proven conservatives. Read More

Pity the 'Super Committee'
By Doyle McManus, Los Angles Times
Pity the poor "super committee." Congress' special task force on the deficit already had a mission that looked nearly impossible: producing a plan to reduce the federal government's fiscal gap by $1.2 trillion over 10 years. And then the job got harder. Read more

The Trojan Horse?
By Yochi Dreazen, National Journal
Tens of thousands of followers of influential Shiite cleric Moktada al-Sadr flooded the streets of Baghdad, Najaf, and Basra last week for some of the largest public rallies in several years. At one point, they might have been demonstrating—even fighting—against the United States as part of the Sadr-led uprising that made the young man’s name. But these protests weren’t about the U.S. presence. Instead, they focused on a different target: the government of Iraq itself. Read more

Rick Perry, Mitt Romney spar in Republican presidental debate
By Dan Balz and Perry Bacon Jr., Washington Post
Texas Gov. Rick Perry and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney tangled over Social Security, health care and other issues here Thursday in a debate in which the Republican presidential candidates sharply criticized the policies of President Obama and joined in an assault on the federal government. Read more

Rick Rolled
By John Dickerson, Slate
The Republican presidential debate in Orlando was sponsored by Google, but it was Gov. Rick Perry who was searching. The frontrunner's answers meandered. When fielding a hypothetical question about terrorists getting nukes in Pakistan, his response ribboned out like he was reading the first search results to come up. Even when he read his attack lines on rival Mitt Romney from the notes on his lectern, it was muddy. This was Perry's third debate this campaign; with each successive one, his performance gets worse. Read more

Perry and Romney Come Out Swinging at Each Other in G.O.P. Debate
By Jim Rutenberg and Jeff Zeleny, The New York Times
In their third debate in as many weeks, former Gov. Mitt Romney of Massachusetts and Gov. Rick Perry of Texas engaged in a sometimes heated back and forth over immigration, health care and entitlements, their rivalry dominating a stage that included seven other candidates struggling to catch up in the race for the Republican presidential nomination. Read more

Advantage, Romney?
By Beth Reinhard, National Journal
More pivotal to the outcome of the GOP presidential race than Rick Perry’s position on Social Security or Mitt Romney’s record on health care reform may be a procedural matter imperceptible to most voters—the 2012 primary calendar. Read more

Mullen: Pakistan’s Spy Agency Supported Attacks on Americans
By Martha Raddatz, ABC News
Before today, never has a U.S. official so bluntly and publicly linked the government of Pakistan to attacks on American troops in Afghanistan. Today on the Hill, Joint Chiefs of Staff Adm. Mike Mullen said Pakistan’s intelligence agency Inter-Services Intelligence Agency [ISI] supported a group of terrorists who carried out two recent attacks on U.S. targets in Afghanistan, becoming the first U.S. official to so directly accuse Pakistan of supporting terrorism against the U.S. Read more

Three Leaders and the Third Rail of Foreign Affairs
By James Kitfield, National Journal
There are reasons why the Israeli-Palestinian conflict remains among the most enduring in international affairs, and many of them were on display this week as world leaders gathered at the United Nations to contemplate a vote on Palestinian statehood. The three key players arrived in New York already boxed in by their personal histories of distrust, and by powerful domestic constituencies. Read more