Series Blog

Archive for February 2013

Why Celebrate the Emancipation Proclamation?


On New Years Day, 1863, William Lloyd Garrison, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Frederick Douglass, and countless other abolitionists across the nation waited anxiously for word on the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation. In grade school, I learned that it freed the slaves. But when I later read the document, I realized that it was not that simple: Lincoln only freed the slaves on Confederate soil, exempting those states under Union occupation and those fighting for the Union. Why, then, on January first, 1863, did abolitionists celebrate the news of partial emancipation as if it fulfilled the very core of their mission?


American Experience Honored with 12th Eric Barnouw Award


American Experience has been honored with the 2013 Eric Barnouw Award for its recent film, Death and the Civil WarThis is the 12th time an American Experience production has received this honor.

From acclaimed filmmaker Ric BurnsDeath and the Civil War examines the many ways the staggering death tolls of the Civil War permanently altered the character of the republic, and the psyche of the American people.  The work of contending with death on an unprecedented scale propelled extraordinary changes in the inner and outer life of Americans – posing challenges for which there were no ready answers when the war began  – challenges that called forth remarkable and eventually heroic efforts as Americans worked to improvise new solutions, new institutions, new ways of coping with death on an unimaginable scale. Based on Drew Gilpin Faust’s groundbreaking book, This Republic of Suffering, the film was broadcast in conjunction with the 150th anniversary of Antietam, the bloodiest day in American history.