Patricia Livermore, daughter-in-law of Jesse Livermore

[The Livermores] lived in utter splendor, typical of the twenties when… society was showy and wealth was displayed. They had a beautiful place on 76th Street in Manhattan on the West Side, off Central Park. They had a floor at 813 Fifth Avenue because Dorothea did not like to go to the West Side to change her clothes. They had a house in Great Neck. They had a summer house in Lake Placid. They had a house in Palm Beach. They had a private railroad car, two yachts. The only yacht that was bigger was J. P. Morgan’s. And they used one of them, the big one, very frequently when they went to Europe. They lived very comfortably…

Jesse Livermore had a ticker tape in every home that he owned, on his railway cars, on his yachts… They had several Rolls Royces, lots of chauffeurs. They had a staff of about 20 or 25 and in each place, in each house, see, and with the exception of Dorothea’s personal maid, they did not take their staffs with them. They simply kept them year-round in all their establishments…

Oh, they lived. They really lived… Mrs. Livermore was a spender. And, of course, she loved to buy. She spent her days buying and buying and buying…

One day Dorothea Livermore decided that her sons should grow up speaking French. So, let’s say, between probably nine or ten o’clock in the morning and four o’clock or four-thirty, whenever Mr. Livermore was due back, she fired her entire staff and replaced them with all French-speaking servants. So that when he came home he wasn’t even able to change his clothes because his new valet didn’t speak English and Mr. Livermore did not speak French. So they finally reached a compromise by the next day that he could keep his valet, but his valet could not talk to the children because the children from that point on were to speak nothing but French. And, of course, she didn’t speak French, so there was very little communication in the family and within a week the old staff was returned and a French governess was retained and that was the end of that little fiasco.

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