The Canal Record, a weekly newspaper that began under the leadership of George Washington Goethals in 1907, was designed to improve the camaraderie and morale of canal workers. This fact-driven paper published excavation statistics that encouraged a healthy rivalry between work sites, and included information on social activities along the canal such as concerts, dances, or sporting competitions.

Printed below are the opening pages of the very first volume of the Canal Record, published in September of 1907.

Canal Record

Published Weekly Under Authority and Supervision of the Isthmian Canal Commission
September 4, 1907, to August 26, 1908
Volume I. with Index
Ancon, Canal Zone: Isthmian Canal Commission Printing Office, 1908.

“The Canal Record” is issued free of charge, one copy each, to all employes of the Commission whose names are on the “gold” roll. Extra copies can be obtained from the news stands of the Panama Railway Company for five cents each.

Address all Communications: THE CANAL RECORD, Ancon, Canal Zone, Isthmus of Panama.

ANNOUNCEMENT

The primary purpose of THE CANAL RECORD, is the publication of accurate information, based upon official records, concerning all branches of the work of Canal construction. So far as practicable, the progress made week by week, month by month, and year by year will be shown in comparative tables of statistics. In addition there will be published such information in regard to the social life of the Zone, its amusements, sports and other activities, as it thought to be of general interest. Space will also be given to letters from employees relating to any topic upon which they may choose to write, subject only to the restrictions that such communications must be couched in respectful language and must be signed in each instance with the name and address of the writer.

NOTES OF PROGRESS

Lock and Dam Works at Gatun.
The work on the locks and dams has taken such shape that it is now possible to see something of their form. It is believed that the actual masonry work can be commenced at the Gatun Locks within eighteen months. Four steam shovels are now digging out the site for the locks, and construction can be begun after the excavation for the top lock of the flight is completed. Two steam shovels are preparing the site for the erection of the spillway works of the Gatun dam. Railroad trestles are being erected across the line that will mark the inside and outside boundaries of the big dam, and from one of these, dirt trains are now dumping dirt upon the site of the dam. Preparatory to the installation of pipeline dredges, by which more rapid work on the dam will be possible, the Chagres river has been diverted from its main channel and dammed. The pipe-line dredges should be installed by the first of January, when the work at Gatun will be as actively in progress as that at Culebra. Suitable sand and rock for the big masonry locks have been located, and, what is equally interesting to the engineers, material for the manufacture of all the necessary cement has been located on the Isthmus. It is hoped, however, that cement can be secured for such a price in the United States as to make it more advisable to procure the needed supply there instead of manufacturing it on the Isthmus.

The general features, design and details of the Gatun and other locks have been worked out, together with the general type and number of lock gates to be used. The survey of all the country to be converted into the great Gatun lake has been completed, and the finished reports show that the area will be 171 square miles.

The Reorganization in Culebra Cut.
With the approval of the Chairman and of the Commissioner in charge of all the excavation, the ten miles of the Culebra Division was reorganized on the first of July last in accordance with a plan presented by Mr. L.K. Rourke, after discussion with Mr. Bolich. This created four divisions, each of which is about two and a half miles in extent, and is under the direction of a local superintendent. Mr. George A. Greenslade has been assigned to the district north of Matachin, which is now officially referred to as the Tabernilla District. Mr. Dan E. Crowley has charge of all the work between Stations 1600 and 1720, designated the Empire District. Mr. Joseph Little is responsible for what is known as the Culebra District, extending from Stations 1720 to 1840. The Pedro Miguel District, running south from Station 1840 to La Boca, is in charge of Mr. D.B. Brown. Between Matachin and Bas Obispo Mr. Fred L. Hartigan is in charge of what is known as the Bas Obispo District. Within their respective territories these local superintendents are held responsible for everything that is done therein. They report direct to the Assistant Division Engineer, Mr. Rourke, who in turn reports to Mr. Bolich, the Division Engineer, to whom the Commissioner in charge of all excavation looks for results from the Culebra Cut. Within each subdivision promotion among the foremen, so far as practicable, is, according to seniority and efficiency, as determined by actual results. The effect of this concentration of authority is shown in the records made so far during the rainy season which have been second only to the best accomplished before the rains set in. It has been estimated that about 52,000,000 cubic yards would have to be removed from the Culebra Cut to complete the canal authorized by Congress. Of this amount there has been removed at least 8,500,000 cubic yards. About 4,775,000 cubic yards of this have been removed during the seven months of this year, and the total for the year is likely to reach 10,000,000 cubic yards.

Club House Libraries
The libraries which were purchased by the Commission under direction of the Secretary of War for the four new Recreation Buildings have arrived and will be placed in the reading rooms as soon as proper provision for their care can be made. The books, of which there are about 600 for each library, were purchased in the States by a representative of the Commission, who was aided in their selection by officers of the National Y.M.C.A.: who have had large experience in work of this kind. The standard reference books, and the works on history, travel, science, philosophy and religion are the same in all four libraries, but the fiction is different in each case, the purpose being to change it about from one library to another from time to time, in order to make the whole body of it accessible to all sections of the Zone.

Nine and a Half Millions in Supplies.
The total value of all the supplies that have been received down to date by the Division of Material and Supplies aggregates nine and a half million dollars. Mr. Tubby, the Chief of the Division, reports that of this amount over 90 per cent covers purchases made in the United States. During the last fiscal year the average monthly disbursements of the Division amounted to $750,000.

Quinine and Sickness.
There was less quinine dispensed by the Medical Department of the Canal Zone during the month of July last, than during any previous month of the present year. In January the total issue amounted to 342.25 pounds avoidupois. During February and March last the issues dropped to 38.88 and to 76.78 pounds, respectively. Last May the amount had to be increased to 452.15 pounds. In July the total quantity administered amounted to only 33.15 pounds, although the number of laborers was 10,000 greater than in July, 1906. The sick rate per thousand was 28 in July 1907, and in July, 1906, it was 30 per thousand. In July, 1906, the death rate among the negroes was 72 per thousand as against 42 per thousand this year; an d in the total force of Canal employees on the rolls, in July, 1906, it was 64 per thousand as against 35 per thousand in July, 1907.

Colon, during July, 1906, had a death rate of 77 per thousand. During July, 1907, this fell to 43 per thousand. On the Canal Zone the death rate for the entire native population was 76 per thousand in July, 1906, and only 34 per thousand in July, 1907.

Movement and Repair of Trains.
In the shops the amount of work necessary to keep the railroad and excavating machinery capable of doing as much in the rainy season as in the dry is very great. An item in the annual report of the Panama Railroad shows the increased activity of the rolling stock that must be cared for by the Mechanical Departments of the Commission and of the Railroad. In June, 1906, the railroad handled 994 trains on its own account of Canal construction. During June, 1907, the commercial and strictly Panama Railroad trains numbered 1,284 while those handled for the construction of the Canal amounted to 3,874. The increase in the number of trains moving on the Isthmus, indicated by these figures, has been such that there have been times during the present rainy season when the number of trains passing a given point on a single day has been as many 196. The work by which the Mechanical Department contributes to this activity can be understood when it is remembered that the majority of the cars and engines in service are daily subjected to the wear and tear of being loaded by steam shovels, which, in a desire to increase their record for a big day’s work, not infrequently drop on a car a single rock weighing as much as 21,000 pounds.  At the dumping grounds the mechanical methods for quickly discharging such loads impose an additional wear and tear on the cars. The annual reports from the Mechanical Departments show that during the past year, at the Gorgona shops, 1,179 locomotives and over 9,156 cars were repaired; that in the Empire shops, which are now in progress of rebuilding, 916 locomotives and over 717 cars were similarly attended to; and the Paraiso shops, of which even the general public on the Isthmus hear comparatively little, made “running repairs” to 4,116 locomotives and to 14,206 cars of all kinds.

New Zone Highways.
New trails completed on the Canal Zone since the first of December last have an aggregate length of over 37 miles. Mr. Campen, Superintendent of Public Works, placed his assistants, Linn M. Huntington and Francis P. Machler in charge of the construction of those highways and the men under their direction have now cleared, graded and ditched a seven-mile trail from the city of Panama into the interior; a five-mile trail from Pedro Miguel to Araijan; a trail from Empire to La Chorrera and a trail from the old town of Cruces to Bas Obispo. Between Culebra and Empire there is now a macadamized road. From Empire, one of the new trails passes through Bas Obispo and Matachin to Gorgona, and with the road makes a continuous highway for the eight miles between Culebra and Gorgona. In the vicinity of Ancon several needed short trails have been constructed so as to connect the main trails leading into the interior. On the Colon side of the Zone, one of the new trails connects with the new road from Colon to Mount Hope and makes easy of access three miles of the interior of the district of Cristobal.

Building Department Work.
The annual report of the Building Department shows that during the past year 253 new buildings have been erected for white employees and 335 new buildings for the use of laborers. Eighteen new mess halls, four club houses, two lodge halls, and four school houses were also finished and turned over for the benefit of the employees. Ten new fire station houses, a church, a large office building, four post offices and three fumigation houses have also been completed. The Commission buildings reported as completed at Gatun on July 1, 1906, numbered 5, and at Culebra 147. Mr. Belding, the Master Builder, now reports the completion during the year ending July 1, 1907, of 92 new buildings at Gatun and 67 at Culebra.

Commission Club Houses.
The total membership of the four Commission Club Houses at Culebra, Empire, Gorgona, and Cristobal is more than sixteen hundred, and applications are still being filed each day. All classes of white men are largely represented. The Culebra Club membership numbers 360, which is the smallest enrollment of the four and is due to the fact that Culebra now has a smaller population than any of the other three towns. Over 50 per cent of all men in Culebra eligible to membership have joined the club.

The four clubs have formed an Isthmian Bowling League, with regular games scheduled each week. Trophies will be given to winning teams and to individuals making the highest scores. Similar tournaments are being played by those interested in chess and checkers. Local tournaments of billiards and pool are now being held preliminary to selecting teams for an Isthmian League. The keen interest in these games, together with the reading rooms, lectures and entertainments of various character, gymnasium classes and games has become so general that it is necessary to use the entertainment hall certain evenings of the week for these purposes. Basket ball equipment has just been added.

The demand for educational classes is greater than present space and equipment have been able to meet. The public entertainments brought from the United States have proved very popular and will be continued as steadily as possible. The next series of entertainments will be furnished by Sidney Landon, character delineator, who is expected to arrive by the steam “Dunottar Castle.”

Colonizing European Laborers.
The Division of Labor, Quarters and Subsistence has under consideration a plan by which European laborers on the Isthmus may bring their families here. The plan contemplates the erection of cheap houses upon small tracts of land, establishing settlements in close proximity to the work along the Line. The colonization of these people, it is thought, would give a steady and permanent supply of the best labor available for the Canal work, and would result in clearing and improving a good portion of the land belonging to the Commission within the Zone.

The steam shovels in service on the Isthmus, July 1, 1907, were 63, of which 3 are 45-ton shovels, 28 are 70-ton shovels, and 32 are 95-ton shovels.

* *

Deaths from tropical diseases, including employees and civil population, on the Isthmus, during the month of July, are reported by Colonel Gorgas as follows:
Beri-beri . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Dysentery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Malaria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Death from all other causes  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .303
Total deaths . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 357

 FRENCH AND AMERICAN RECORDS

Highest elevation of new center line of Canal before excavation began by the French:
At Culebra  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 312 feet
At Bas Obispo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .233 feet 

Greatest depth of excavation by the French:
On I.C.C. Canal axis at Culebra . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161 feet
On I.C.C. Canal axis at Bas Obispo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148 feet

Greatest center-line depth remaining to be excavated when Americans took control in order to reach the bottom of an 85-foot level canal:
At Culebra-at same point as above . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .111 feet
At barrier on Contractor’s Hill  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .about 140 feet
At Bas Obispo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 feet

Amount excavated under American control:
In Culebra Cut (canal prism) to April 1, 1907 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5,750,000 cubic yards
Total excavation by the French at all points and including diversion channel. . . about 70,600,006 cubic yards

Total estimated excavation required April 1, 1907, for an 85-foot level canal:
In canal prism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101,050,000 cubic yards
On lock sites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . 7,965,000 cubic yards
For regulating works and diversion channel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,150,000 cubic yards
Dredging in old Canal, Cristobal to Gatun, to open construction channel, and at Panama, to keep channel open to La Boca . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,350,000 cubic yards
Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .114,515,000 cubic yards

EXCAVATION BY DREDGES

Monthly Totals since American Occupation at Colon. 

 

 

                         Cubic Yards, Place Measurement

 

1905

1906

1907

Months

In Canal Prism

Outside of Canal Prism

In Canal Prism

Outside of Canal Prism

In Canal Prism

Outside of Canal Prism

January

 

 

 

90,700

 

111,100

February

 

 

 

105,500

 

110,002

March

 

 

 

126,650

 

84,145

April

 

 

 

87,200

 

69,889

May

 

 

 

64,875

 

133,847

June

 

60,700

 

73,500

17,000

107,118

July

 

58,050

 

69,000

*104,322

5,600

August

 

53,183

 

54,000

 

 

September

 

48,837

 

123,540

 

 

October

 

48,800

 

111,020

 

 

November

 

38,000

 

63,260

 

 

December

 

92,250

 

58,400

 

 

Totals…

 

 

399,820

 

1,027,645

 

 

Total to Aug. 1, 1907 – 2,170,488 cubic yards.

*On this division there was also removed from the prism 731 yards in the Mindi Hills by steam shovels.

Monthly Totals Since American Occupation at La Boca 

 

 

                         Cubic Yards, Place Measurement

 

1905

1906

1907

Months

In Canal Prism

Outside of Canal Prism

In Canal Prism

Outside of Canal Prism

In Canal Prism

Outside of Canal Prism

January

 

 

 

95,940

 

94,710

February

 

 

 

95,940

 

93,480

March

 

 

 

116,820

 

92,319

April

 

 

 

110,700

 

104,855

May

 

 

 

112,340

 

122,157

June

 

50,676

 

62,697

64,352

67,228

July

 

41,533

 

98,400

108,338

 

August

 

54,530

 

111,930

 

 

September

 

114,308

 

105,780

 

 

October

 

81,836

 

97,170

 

 

November

 

71,176

 

92,988

 

 

December

 

71,094

 

90,528

 

 

Totals…

 

 

485,153

 

1,191,233

 

 

Total to Aug. 1, 1907 – 2,423,825 cubic yards.

RECORD OF EXCAVATION.

Monthly Totals Since American Occupation

IN CULEBRA CUT.

Steam Shovels.

 

 

                         Cubic Yards, Place Measurement

Months

1904 Cubic Yards

1905 Cubic Yards

1906 Cubic Yards

1907 Cubic Yards

January

 

70,650

120,990

566,750

February

 

75,200

168,410

638,644

March

 

132,840

239,178

815,270

April

 

126,749

213,177

879,527

May

 

75,935

194,645

690,365

June

 

76,905

207,760

624,586

July

31,599

78,570

157,093

770,570

August

35,056

49,210

244,844

 

September

25,220

44,085

292,000

 

October

49,695

52,940

325,835

 

November

28,860

60,540

221,642

 

December

42,935

70,630

278,197

 

Totals…

 

183,365

914,254

2,663,771

4,985,712

Total, 1904. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183,365 cubic yards
Total, 1905. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 914,254 cubic yards
Total, 1906. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,663,771 cubic yards
Total, 1907 (seven months only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4,985,712 cubic yards
Grand total to Aug. 1, 1907. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8,747,102 cubic yards

AT GATUN AND LA BOCA

Steam Shovels.

 

 

                         Cubic Yards, Place Measurement

 

1906

1907

Months

In Canal Prism

Outside of Canal Prism

In Canal Prism

Outside of Canal Prism

January

 

 

47,539

 

February

 

 

70,177

 

March

 

 

100,151

 

April

 

 

103,459

 

May

 

 

70,528

 

June

 

 

71,181

3,832

July

 

 

59,537

14,628

August

 

 

 

 

September

 

 

 

 

October

3,055

 

 

 

November

11,517

 

 

 

December

12,056

 

 

 

Totals…

 

26,628

 

522,572

18,460

La Boca Locks, Dams and Spillways

January

 

 

 

 

February

 

 

 

 

March

 

 

 

 

April

 

 

538

3,367

May

 

 

 

1,756

June

 

 

 

762

July

 

 

 

4,907

August

 

 

 

9,047

September

 

 

 

 

October

 

 

 

 

November

 

 

 

 

December

 

 

 

 

Totals…

 

 

 

538

19,839


SPORTS AND GAMES.

Baseball.

J.P. Avis, of the Chairman’s office, announces that the “All-Kentuckians” have organized a team, accepted the challenge, and are anxious to try conclusions with the Georgia men.

A team has been organized at Culebra, composed entirely of players from the state of Georgia. They are open for challenges from any baseball club consisting of members from any one state in the Union and would like to get a game at an early date. Challenges should be address to W.S. Halstead, care Chief Engineer’s office, Culebra, Canal Zone. The men from Georgia line up as follows: Brown, catcher; Arnell, pitcher; Roberts, first base; J.B. Huff, second base; Gamble, third base; Fleishman, short stop; Shannon, right field; Halstead, center field; P. Huff, left field.

The first game of baseball of the championship series took place at Empire, August 27, between the I.C.C. and Empire clubs. The following is the summary:

            EMPIRE A.B. B. H. P.O. A. E.
Erile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .      2 0 1         1            1      2
McCusty (5th) . . . . . . . . . . .    2           0      0     0            1         1
Gazzonni . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   4    0      0           1         2         1
Fluharty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4       0      1         4           2       0
Sprecken . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3            0          0           0            0     0
Murphy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3            0            0            4           1             0
Toome . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3             0             1         3            0      0
Fussner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3            0              0             6            0     3
Craddock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  3           0           0            2           1          0
                                                30      0          3           24         10         8

            I.C.C.           A.B.  B.   H.   P.O.   A. E.
Bryan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4       2            0            0            2            1
Huff, P. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4       1            2            1            0            0
Bell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4          1           0            8            1            0
Christopher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4            0            0            2            1            0
Gamble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4             0            0            3            3            0
Avis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4           0            1            0            0            0
Yingling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4           1            1            4            3            0
South (6th) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2            1            2            0            0            0
Sorrell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4            0            0            9            1            0
                                               36            6            6            27            11            1

Innings . . . . . . . . . . . . 1            2            3            4            5            6            7            8            9
I.C.C . . . . . . . . . . . . .    0            0            1            0            3            2            0            0            x - 6
Empire . . . . . . . . . . . .   0            0            0            0            0            0            0            0            0 - 0

Two base hits – Huff, P.: South. Double plays – Toone, Fluharty, Craddock; Christopher, Bell, Yingling; Sorrel, Yingling; Yingling, Bell. Stolen bases – I.C.C., 8; Empire, 5. Errors – I.C.C. 1; Empire, 8; Base hits – Off Sorrell, 3; off Henry, 6. Strike outs – Sorrell, 8; Henry, 2. Base on balls – By Sorrell, 3; by Henry, 2; Hit by pitcher – By Henry, 2. Umpire – Dr. Summersgill. Scorer – Manley. Time of game – Two hours and fifteen minutes.

Chess and Checkers.
There are several chess, checkers, and billiard tournaments in progress at the Empire and the Culebra clubs, where the results will be known in in time for publication in the issue of September 11th.

Bowling.
Team.                 Played. Won. Lost.  Percent.
Cristobal            9              7             2            .777
Empire               9            5           4            .555
Gorgona            9              5            4            .555
Culebra            9              1            8            .111

COMMISSION DECISIONS.

Final Pay in the United States.
Employes who resign while in the United States, may now with the approval of the Chairman of the Commission, be paid for leave with pay granted them, less one week, without being required to return to the Isthmus, provided they shall have completed at least two years service at the expiration of such leave.

New Furniture Allowance.
On August 15th the Commission adopted a resolution providing that the allowance of furniture for families of employes receiving less than $400.00 per month, be fixed as follows:
1 Range                        1 Refrigerator
1 Double bed                 1 Double mattress
2 Pillows                        1 Kitchen table
2 Kitchen chairs            1 Dining table
6 Dining chairs              1 Sideboard
1 Chiffonier                     1 Dresser
2 Center tables               1 Bedroom mat
1 Mosquito bar            3 Wicker rockers

That for employes receiving $400.00 per month, or over, the following additional articles be authorized and that same come up to specifications laid down for the former “C” class of furniture.
3 Dining chairs            1 Dresser
1 Chiffonier                  1 Bedroom mat
1 Towel racks              1 Parlor wicker rocker
1 Parlor desk
2 Parlor chairs             1 Morris chair
1 Porch swing              1 Porch double seats
1 Serving table

That the issue of beds, mattress and mosquito bars in excess of this allowance be authorized to families with children.
Two Assistant Secretaries of Club Houses, capable of conducting gymnastic exercises have been authorized at $125.00 per month.

Longevity Regulations.
The following regulations in regard to longevity increases in pay, which were made effective May 1, 1907, under the instructions of the Secretary of War, and with the approval of the President, were adopted at the meeting of the Isthmian Canal Commission on August 1st:
(a)   All employees not natives to the tropics, who occupy the positions herein designated shall be granted the following increases in pay for length of continuous service on the Isthmus:
Five per cent of the basic or class rate for the second year, with a cumulative addition of three per cent of the basic rate for each subsequent year; provided, however, that such cumulative increase shall not exceed a total of twenty-five per cent of the basic rate.
(b)  The positions to which these regulations apply are as follows:
Barge Engineers                        Steam Shovel Engineers
Tug Engineers                            Steamshovel Cranemen
Dredge Engineers                       
Launch Engineers
Yardmasters                               Molders
Trainmen                                    Painters
Biolermakers                               Pipefitters
Car Repairers                             Tinsmiths
Drill Runners                               Wiremen
Hostlers                                       Captains of Steam Vessels
Masons
Millwrights                                   Bricklayers
Patternmakers                            Coppersmiths
Shipwrights                                 Channelers
Well Drillers                                 Firemen
Train Conductors                        Machinists
Blacksmiths                                Motormen
Carpenters                                 Plasterers
Cabinet Makers                          Plumbers
Diamond Drill Setters                  Planning Mill Machine hands
Iron Workers
(c)   In the case of an employee transferred to the Commission from the Panama Railroad Company, his service on the Isthmus with the latter will be reckoned the same as service with the Commission.
(d)  By “service” is meant all time on the Commission’s roll in any class of employment, from the date of entering the Isthmian service to the date of termination of same.
(e)   The class rate may be changed at any time if circumstances arise justifying such action.

Holiday Pay for Laborers.
The Chairman’s Circular of May 20, 1907, providing that Effective June1, pay of Grade A-1 laborers will be at the rate of 13 1/3 cents silver per hour for ten hours, and time and one-half on 20 cents silver for time over 10 hours and on Sundays and holidays, has been modified as follows:

On January 1, February 22, May 30, July 4, Labor Day, Decoration Day, Thanksgiving Day and December 25, when laborers work on the day preceding and the day subsequent to holiday they should be allowed 9 hours gratuity time for holiday, and if besides being present (either for a whole day or a fractional part thereof) on these days they actually perform service on holiday they are entitled to their gratuity time plus actual straight time put in on holiday. Grade A-1 laborers to be paid this gratuity time and straight time at the rate of 20 cents per hour. If a laborer, Grade A-1, at 13 1/3 cents, works on the holiday but does not work on the day preceding and the day following, his service on that holiday should be computed as straight time at the rate of 20 cents silver per hour.

All hourly employees not designated as laborers, who perform service of a higher class to receive 8 hours gratuity and time one-half for actual service. In this connection, see copy of the Chairman’s circular of August 1, 1907, showing employees who should be considered as belonging to this class of laborers.

 

My American Experience

My American Experience photos

Share Your Story

Have you gone through the locks? Or, did you have a family member who worked on the Panama Canal? Share your photos, stories and experiences.



  • Additional funding for this program was provided by

  • Arthur Vining Davis Foundations
  • NEH