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CHRONOLOGICAL: 1624 - 1865:

1624  |   1826  |   1847  |   1854

Coney Island

Coney Island (1847-1964)
Internationally famous carnival of delights, offering everything from the bawdy to the surreal.
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Before there was Disneyland, there was Coney Island. By the turn of the century, this tiny spit of New York real estate was internationally famous as the world's most remarkable carnival of delights, offering everything from the bawdy to the surreal. The hot dog was invented here; so was the roller coaster.

Telegrams from the Dead (1848-1888)
(no website available)
A new religion called spiritualism affects the nation as no other ever had.
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For 40 years, a new religion called spiritualism affected the nation as no other ever had. Abraham Lincoln, P.T. Barnum, Frederick Douglass, senators, and scientists argued over the discoveries of the spirit world as revealed through mediums. Congress debated whether to provide $40,000 to research the feasibility of using the new wireless technology to reach the other world. But by 1880, as one spectacular fraud after another was revealed, the movement began to fade.

One Woman, One Vote (1848-1920)
(no website available)
The infighting, the alliances and betrayals, defeats and victories on the way to winning the right to vote.
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From Elizabeth Cady Stanton's electrifying call to arms at Seneca Falls in 1848, to the last battle for passage of the Nineteenth Amendment in 1920, a recounting of the infighting, the alliances and betrayals, defeats and victories on the way to winning the right to vote. The struggle split the suffragist movement into two opposing forces: the militants who faced imprisonment and riots and those who argued for a quieter, more persuasive ways. Both tactics, it turned out, were needed.
Murder at Harvard

Murder at Harvard (1849-1850)
A brutal murder, a sensational trial -- and a lingering mystery.
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In November 1849, Dr. George Parkman, one of Boston's richest citizens, disappeared. The police searched the city and dredged the river. Parkman had last been seen walking towards the Harvard Medical College. A janitor there, Ephraim Littlefield, had a suspicion where Parkman might be found, and what he discovered horrified Boston and led to one of the most sensational trials in American history.Historian Simon Schama plays a key role in the film as a "time-traveling" detective trying to uncover the truth behind the case. He probes the lingering mysteries of this notorious trial and the larger philosophical question of how we can ever know what happened in the past.
Golden Gate Bridge

Golden Gate Bridge (1849-1994)
The story of how San Francisco built one of the "Seven Wonders of the Modern World."
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On May 27, 1937, 200,000 people thronged to the newly-completed Golden Gate bridge and walked, climbed, skated or cycled across. After 18 years of struggles to complete the bridge, San Francisco's jubilance was unrestrained. There was a tap dancer, a tuba player and a woman determined to be the first to walk its length with her tongue out.Twenty years earlier, choked off at the tip of a peninsula, San Francisco had faced a future of increased congestion and economic strangulation. Though many in the city longed for a bridge connecting San Francisco to the counties to the north, the obstacles to construction were daunting. It took a hustler and self-promoter, a man who had never designed or overseen the building of a suspension bridge, to take up the challenge. Joseph Strauss spent thirteen years wrangling with local politicians, arguing with the War Department over designs and fighting lawsuits from bridge opponents before he was able to break ground. By the time the bridge was complete, Strauss, his team of designers and his construction crews had built what has since been called one of the "Seven Wonders of the Modern World."

Roots of Resistance -- The Story of the Underground Railroad (1850-1865)
(no website available)
Men and women, black and white, risked their lives to carve an elaborate network of escape routes out of slavery.
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Men and women, black and white, risked their lives to carve an elaborate network of escape routes out of slavery in the mid 1800s -- trails and backroads, safehouses, river crossings and night trains leading as far north as Canada. Disguises, secret rendezvous and special codes were used to guard the identity of "conductors" and their fugitive "passengers." But flight to free territory didn't guarantee freedom; fugitives could be hunted down and returned.

Yosemite -- The Fate of Heaven (1850-1989)
(no website available)
A stunning film portrait of Yosemite National Park.
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A stunning film portrait of Yosemite National Park. The film's narration is taken from using the 1851 diary of the first expedition of soldiers into the sacred valley home of the Ahwahnechee tribe and introduces today's hikers and campers, to whom Yosemite is a true shrine.

Geronimo and the Apache Resistance (1851-1886)
(no website available)
The story of a tragic collision of two civilizations.
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The story of a tragic collision of two civilizations, each with startlingly different views of one another. In 1886, 5,000 U.S. troops mobilized to capture this one man and his band of followers, who by refusing to move onto a reservation, defied and eluded federal authorities.
CHRONOLOGICAL: 1624 - 1865:

1624  |   1826  |   1847  |   1854

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