American Experience
New Look, New Stories

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New Look, New Stories

Joseph Pulitzer, editor of The World, pioneered visual elements that became standard in newspapers. He splashed images across multiple columns, designed attractive headlines, and considered what his paper would look like folded on a newsstand. Previously, the layout of a newspaper consisted of uniform single columns. Important stories were distinguished by several successive headlines. Pulitzer's visual innovations were soon co-opted by his competitors, expecially William Randolph Hearst.

In addition to adopting a bolder visual style, newspapers expanded the notions of newsworthiness to include more human-interest stories. Sports pages, women's news and kids' sections, and comics became commonplace. In a city like New York, accounts of activities about town helped make the urban landscape seem more familiar. Even staid publications like The New York Times expanded their leisure and feature pages in response to the popularity of The World and The Evening Standard. White, Nesbit and Thaw were familiar faces in the society pages well before shots were fired in Madison Square Garden. Their fame drew even more readers to the newspapers, to absorb all the story's fascinating details.

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1 -- Manufacturing Advances 2 -- New Look, New Stories 3 -- Yellow Journalism