Taiwan

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Political

1910-1945: Taiwan is a colony of Japan.

1946-1949: Taiwan is a province of China. All Japanese are withdrawn by August 1946. In 1949 the Nationalists from mainland China take over political, economic, and social control of Taiwan even though they are outnumbered by native Taiwanese three to one. Claiming they are the only legitimate government of China, the Nationalists stage massive military and political rallies and vow to retake the mainland.

1950-1959: The Nationalist government begins to win back popular support with their land-reform policies, which give landowners a share in government industries in exchange for their property.

1960-1969: Within Taiwan and around the world, people begin to question which is the "real" China. Several nations break relations with Taipei and recognize Beijing.

1970-1974: The United States funds covert efforts to recruit agents, provide cover for underground operations, and disseminate anticommunist propaganda from Taiwan, even as it begins talks to normalize relations with the People's Republic of China (PRC). The Taiwan delegation withdraws from the United Nations in anticipation of losing its seat to the PRC.

1975-1985: After three years of serious illness, Chiang Kai-shek dies. His son, Chiang Ching-kuo, takes over as president and will head the Nationalist Party until his own death in 1988.

1986-1989: New political parties and a free press are allowed. Upon Chiang Ching-kuo's death, Lee Teng-hui becomes the first native Taiwanese president. Pro-democracy demonstrations raise the issue of which is the "real" China. Nationalists declare for first time that there are two legitimate governments of China, each representing part of the country. Beijing responds with strong anti-separatist language.

1990-1995: Pro-democracy activities continue as Taiwan gears up for its first-ever presidential elections.

1996-2003: Nationalist leader and native Taiwanese Lee Teng-hui is elected president by a wide margin in the 1996 election. Chen Shui-bian's election in 2000 marks the end of Nationalist Party rule and the rise of the Democratic People's Party (DPP), but the Nationalist party remains strong in opposition and scores well in key municipal elections.

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Categories: Overview | Political | Economic | Social | Environmental | Rule of Law | Trade Policy | Money
Graphs:

Related: LinksView all categories for years from to | See Full Report | Print