Nationalization:
The governmental appropriation of property other than land from the domain of private property to national control. More specifically, the term designates the assumption by a nation of the ownership of privately owned industry, distributive enterprises, or other businesses or services. When applied as part of socialist or communist programs for abolition of private property, nationalization is sometimes known as socialization.
Microsoft® Encarta® Encyclopedia 2001. © 1993-2000 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Neo-Liberalism:
Neo-liberalism, also called neo-liberal institutionalism, emerged in the 1980s as a new liberal response to realism. Neo-liberals believe that the UN and other international institutions can play an important role in resolving conflicts and that it makes more sense for nations to cooperate and work toward long-term mutual gains rather than focusing on short-term individual gains.
Microsoft® Encarta® Encyclopedia 2001. © 1993-2000 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs):
Non-governmental organizations (NGOs) are private organizations whose memberships and activities are international in scope. NGOs do not possess the legal status of national governments. However, the UN and other international forums recognize many NGOs as important political institutions. Examples of NGOs include the Roman Catholic Church, Greenpeace, the International Olympic Committee, and the International Committee of the Red Cross.
International Organization Microsoft® Encarta® Encyclopedia 2001. © 1993-2000 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA):
The trade agreement between the United States, Canada, and Mexico, signed in August 1992 and effective from January 1994. The first trade pact of its kind to link two highly industrialized countries to a developing one, it created a free market of 360 million people, with a total GDP of $6.45 trillion. Tariffs were to be progressively eliminated over a 10-to-15-year period and, as a result, investment into low-wage Mexico by Canada, the United States, and other foreign nations progressively increased. Chile was invited to join in December 1994.
Microsoft® Encarta® Encyclopedia 2001. © 1993-2000 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.