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Cora Unashamed
updated 11.5.2003

Joe's Poem for Cora
Many viewers have asked us for the text of this poem, and its variations, as heard in Cora Unashamed. All were written by Cora Unashamed screenwriter, Anne Peacock.

About 18 minutes into the film, we hear Joe's voice ...


I will see you in the cornfields. I will see you where the bluegrass grows.
I will hear you when I listen as the soft wind blows.
I will see you in the moonlight. I will see you in every star.
I will see you wherever I wander, no matter how far.

And I will keep looking. And I will keep listening.
And I will keep remembering long after the days have gone...
That our love, my dearest, will always live on.


Later, at Jessie's deathbed, Cora says:

When you love someone they're never far away, because they're always with you. That's because love has no time or space. It just continues on forever.

I will see you in the cornfields. I will see you where the green grass grows.
I will hear you when I listen, wherever the soft wind blows.
I will see you in the moonlight. I will see you in every star.
I will see you wherever I wander... no matter how far.

And I will keep listening and I will keep looking
And I will keep remembering, long after the days are gone.
For our love, my dearest, will always live on.




Dear Masterpiece Theatre,
I must agree with the comment made by one of your viewers that stated the characters in Cora Ashamed were not accurately portrayed as per the original Langston Hughes text.

However, I feel obligated to tell you that I was deeply touched by your version of the Langston Hughes short story. I deeply felt Cora's loss of Josephine, it brought me to tears, it made me come to terms as to how I would react if I loss my precious daughter.

I felt renewed in spirit as did the character of Cora did in the final scene when she spoke out against her oppressive employers, and left on to the streets of Melton as a new woman and human being.

Thank you for your quality programming.

Joseph Vigil
Fort Worth, TX




Dear Masterpiece Theatre,
I was very touched with the movie and the great acting in Cora Unashamed. Marian Rees mentioned that each person feels the parts that reach inside one's spirit. I find this to be very true. My own mother was ashamed. In 1914 in New York, a wealthy widow gave birth to my mom, and then hired the nurse's sister to raise her. This all took place in Schenectady, New York. The widow was an aristocrat from Ticonderoga, New York. Mother always had beautiful clothes and all her needs met, except the need to belong to a real family.

In April I buried my mother in New York. I went to the home of her birthmother and asked the grandson if the family would give me permission to change the name on mother's birth certificate to the real name of her birthmother. The family didn't see the need as it was all so long ago. I know the frustration and the helplessness of Cora. We still have to live with rejection for each generation, because of my grandmother's secret and lie. It is a true story that needs a happy ending.

Catherine Baudoin
Dodge Center, MN



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