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Wrap Up

Use the following questions, activity, and theme chart to conclude your study of a particular film or film as a genre.

After-Viewing Questions
  1. What were the most memorable or striking images in this film?
  2. What images or scenes are you still unsure how to interpret?
  3. Look back at your Viewing Logs. What patterns can you see there?
  4. How did your emotional reactions change as you watched?
  5. What are all the things you can think of that this film seems to be about? Make a list.
  6. How would you review this film?
  7. What changes did you notice in the film as you watched?
  8. What conflicts did you notice as you watched?
  9. Did this film remind you of other stories you have read or movies you have seen? Which ones? Why?
  10. In your opinion, is this film neutral or does it clearly take a particular position on an issue?
Adaptation used by permission from Reel Conversations: Reading Films with Young Adults by Alan B. Teasley and Ann Wilder. (c)1997 by Alan B. Teasley and Ann Wilder. Published by Heinemann, a division of Reed Elsevier, Inc., Portsmouth, NH. All Rights Reserved.

Film Scavenger Hunt
To help students integrate what they have learned, create a "scavenger hunt" through a film they are about to watch -- a checklist of significant aspects of the film they have to "find" as they watch. This "hunt" should be as open-ended as possible so there is room for interpretation; for instance, "Find a scene that shows the power relationship between two major characters," or "Find an image that is repeated more than twice. Why do you think this is?" The scavenger hunt could also include specific questions about the use of camera angles ("What long shots do you remember from this film?") or other aspects of filmmaking ("Write one thing you notice about the use of color, costumes, lighting, etc., in this film."). These can then be used as a starting point to discussing what students saw in the film.

Theme Chart
Use the chart below to consider other Masterpiece Theatre titles that you might use as companion texts to teach some of the most common themes in classic literature. You might show the whole film or just excerpts with interesting parallels. Visit the Masterpiece Theatre Web site at pbs.org/masterpiece for additional titles. See also About the Films.

For instance, if you are reading Pride and Prejudice together as a class, you could show Northanger Abbey to look at similarities in Austen's characters and themes. You could also show excerpts from The Mill on the Floss -- another English classic by a woman writer -- to draw parallels between the portrayal of women's roles and a woman's search for identity. Or, if your aim is to look at class in English society while reading Pride and Prejudice, you could show part of a film depicting Victorian-era English society, such as David Copperfield.

Family relationships

Almost a Woman
Anna Karenina
A Death in the Family
Daniel Deronda
David Copperfield
Oliver Twist
Our Town
The Mill on the Floss
Wuthering Heights

Other:

Search for identity,
coming of age


Almost a Woman
Daniel Deronda
David Copperfield
A Death in the Family
Goodbye, Mr. Chips
Northanger Abbey
Oliver Twist
Our Town
The Mill on the Floss
The Road from Coorain

Other:

Women's roles

Almost a Woman
Anna Karenina
Goodbye, Mr. Chips
Northanger Abbey
Rebecca
The Mill on the Floss
The Road from Coorain
The Turn of the Screw

Other:

Love and marriage

Anna Karenina
Daniel Deronda
Doctor Zhivago
The Mill on the Floss
Northanger Abbey
Othello
Our Town
Wuthering Heights

Other:

Class, race,
societal values


Almost a Woman
Daniel Deronda
David Copperfield
Goodbye, Mr. Chips
The Merchant of Venice
Northanger Abbey
Oliver Twist
Othello
Our Town
Wuthering Heights

Other:
Evil, corruption

David Copperfield
Doctor Zhivago
The Hound of the Baskervilles
The Merchant of Venice
Northanger Abbey
Oliver Twist
Othello
Our Town
Rebecca
The Turn of the Screw

Other:


Film in the Classroom:
Film in the Classroom Home | About This Guide | Introduction
The Language of Film | Adaptation | Literary Elements | Wrap Up
Resources | Masterpiece Theatre Online Features | About the Films



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