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All About Archimedes


Infinite Secrets homepage

For ages 8 and older.

Connect the Dots

Connect the dots....Eureka! It's Archimedes sitting in the bath.



Word Search

Circle the following words in the word search below. Words may be found forwards or backwards, or up or down.

math   lever   bath
circle   invention   shape



Learning More

Mr. Archimedes' Bath.
Allen, Pamela. New York: Lothrop, Lee & Shepard Books, 1980.
Introduces buoyancy by telling a story about Archimedes taking a bath with his friends. For children.


Tell Me How Ships Float.
Willis, Shirley. New York, NY: Scholastic Library Publishing, 2000.
Explores floating and sinking and Archimedes' principle of buoyancy with simple experiments. For children.


Archimedes of Syracuse
www-gap.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/~history/Mathematicians/Archimedes.html
Provides a biography of Archimedes, mostly told in the words of Plutarch, a historian who lived in Greece in about A.D. 100. Provides a hands-on buoyancy activity. For all ages.



Simple Machines

Most early inventions were based on simple machines-tools that make work easier. Simple machines help us lift things, pull things, split things, fasten things, and cut things. There are six basic simple machines: the lever, the wedge, the pulley, the wheel and axle, the inclined plane, and the screw. Archimedes used combinations of these machines to create such devices as Archimedes' Claw, a catapult, and Archimedes' Screw. If you look around your home, school, and town, you will discover many other machines and devices that are versions of the six simple machines.

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Infinite Secrets
Library Resource Kit














Infinite Secrets Web Site Content
Contemplating Infinity

Contemplating Infinity
Philosophically, the concept remains a mind-bender.

Working with Infinity

Working with Infinity
Mathematicians have become increasingly comfortable with the concept.

Great Surviving Manuscripts

Great Surviving Manuscripts
Ancient documents offer a tantalizing glimpse of lost cultures.

The Archimedes Palimpsest

The Archimedes Palimpsest
Follow the 1,000-year-long journey of the Archimedes manuscript.

Approximating Pi

Approximating Pi
See Archimedes' geometrical approach to estimating pi.



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