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Archimedes' Screw
Around 269 B.C. Archimedes invented a device for pumping water out of ships. Similar in shape to a screw used to hold wood together, the Archimedes' Screw was used to transport water with a minimum of labor. It is still used today in crop irrigation and wastewater treatment plants.

Heron's Aeolipile
Heron of Alexandria invented the aeolipile in Alexandria, Egypt, around 150 B.C. The aeolipile is a device that transfers steam energy into rotational motion. While Heron considered the aeolipile to be a toy, today it is considered the precursor of the jet engine.

Chinese Water Clock
A water clock uses a steady flow of water to measure time. It was invented in China in about A.D. 200 and used until about 700 years ago. In one version, water ran through a series of cauldrons placed on a staircase. Every two hours a servant would place a sign in front of the clock indicating which two hours had passed.













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