Attack Submarines
Attack submarines, designed to seek and destroy enemy subs and surface ships, are the stealthy members of the battle group. They boast cutting edge technology—the concept of technical prowess over numerical superiority is still the driving force in U.S. submarine development. Other uses range from intelligence collection and the delivery of Special Forces, to anti-ship and strike warfare. The Navy began construction of Seawolf class submarines in 1989. Seawolf is exceptionally quiet, fast and well armed.

Far more common today are the Los Angeles-Class submarines. For more information about these nuclear-powered subs, take a virtual tour of the USS Springfield.

Submarine

General Characteristics, Seawolf class
Power Plant: One nuclear reactor, one shaft
Length: 353 feet (107.6 meters)
Draft: 35 feet (10.67 meters)
Beam: 40 feet (12.2 meters)
Displacement: 8,060 tons surfaced; 9,150 tons submerged
Speed: 25+ knots (28+ miles per hour)
Cost: about $2.1 billion each
Crew: 12 Officers; 121 Enlisted
Armament: Harpoon and Tomahawk missiles, VLS tubes, MK-48 torpedoes, four torpedo tubes.

General Characteristics, Los Angeles class
Power Plant: One nuclear reactor, one shaft
Length: 360 feet (109.73 meters)
Beam: 33 feet (10.06 meters)
Displacement: Approx. 6,900 tons submerged
Speed: 20+ knots (23+ miles per hour)
Crew: 13 Officers, 116 Enlisted
Armament: Harpoon and Tomahawk missiles, VLS tubes, MK-48 torpedoes, four torpedo tubes
Date deployed: November 13, 1976 (USS Los Angeles)

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