Blog Posts

29
Oct

Jean, Laura, And An Instructional Film

Click here for Jean’s profile.

Maybe it was the proximity of a camera, or all those lights, but I found myself thinking a bit harder than a 24 year-old adult should when I took the Wug test with Jean. Thankfully, we native English speakers don’t usually have to think about the mechanics of our rather convoluted language. That’s because we already know it. If we do stop and think about it, though, we see that English has so many exceptions to the rules, so many options. It makes me pity those poor toddlers who have no choice but to take on the task of mastering the English language.

But this blog-maker can safely say that she is a satisfactory English-talker and test-taking lady.

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Laura_100

Laura Willcox

    When Laura is not learning how to play the shofar, wrestle, cheer, skate, and be a synesthete, she is also a producer, writer, and performer in NYC. Laura has associate-produced several segments for NOVA ScienceNOW and “Secret Life”; writes, produces, and appears in comedic web shorts for LandlineTV; and also performs long-form improv comedy at the Upright Citizen’s Brigade Theatre. Laura came very close to being a Biology major at Tufts University, but opted to be a Psychology major instead so that she could learn to read people’s minds.

    • Isabella-the-Bookworm101

      I have an adult understanding of the English language. I said “Wugling” and “Zibber” instead of “Baby Wug” or “Zib Man”.