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31
Jan

The Immortal Life Of Henrietta Lacks (Book Excerpt: Part 3)

This is part three of an excerpt from Rebecca Skloot’s bestselling book, THE IMMORTAL LIFE OF HENRIETTA LACKS. The book tells the story of a poor black tobacco farmer whose cells—taken without her knowledge in 1951—became one of the most important tools in medicine, vital for developing the polio vaccine, cloning, gene mapping, in vitro fertilization, and more. Henrietta’s cells have been bought and sold by the billions, yet she remains virtually unknown, and her family can’t afford health insurance.

Check out parts one and two before you dive in.

Prologue – The Woman In The Photograph (cont.)

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THE IMMORTAL LIFE OF HENRIETTA LACKS by Rebecca Skloot. Copyright © 2010 by Rebecca Skloot.

I couldn’t have imagined it then, but that phone call would mark the beginning of a decadelong adventure through scientific laboratories, hospitals, and mental institutions, with a cast of characters that would include Nobel laureates, grocery store clerks, convicted felons, and a professional con artist. While trying to make sense of the history of cell culture and the complicated ethical debate surrounding the use of human tissues in research, I’d be accused of conspiracy and slammed into a wall both physically and metaphorically, and I’d eventually find myself on the receiving end of something that looked a lot like an exorcism. I did eventually meet Deborah, who would turn out to be one of the strongest and most resilient women I’d ever known. We’d form a deep personal bond, and slowly, without realizing it, I’d become a character in her story, and she in mine.

Deborah and I came from very different cultures: I grew up white and agnostic in the Pacific Northwest, my roots half New York Jew and half Midwestern Protestant; Deborah was a deeply religious black Christian from the South. I tended to leave the room when religion came up in conversation because it made me uncomfortable; Deborah’s family tended toward preaching, faith healings, and sometimes voo doo. She grew up in a black neighborhood that was one of the poorest and most dangerous in the country; I grew up in a safe, quiet middle-class neighborhood in a predominantly white city and went to high school with a total of two black students. I was a science journalist who referred to all things supernatural as “woo-woo stuff”; Deborah believed Henrietta’s spirit lived on in her cells, controlling the life of anyone who crossed its path. Including me.

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Henrietta Lacks

“How else do you explain why your science teacher knew her real name when everyone else called her Helen Lane?” Deborah would say. “She was trying to get your attention.” This thinking would apply to everything in my life: when I married while writing this book, it was because Henrietta wanted someone to take care of me while I worked. When I divorced, it was because she’d decided he was getting in the way of the book. When an editor who insisted I take the Lacks family out of the book was injured in a mysterious accident, Deborah said that’s what happens when you piss Henrietta off.

The Lackses challenged everything I thought I knew about faith, science, journalism, and race. Ultimately, this book is the result. It’s not only the story of HeLa cells and Henrietta Lacks, but of Henrietta’s family—particularly Deborah—and their lifelong struggle to make peace with the existence of those cells, and the science that made them possible.

Excerpted from THE IMMORTAL LIFE OF HENRIETTA LACKS by Rebecca Skloot. Copyright © 2010 by Rebecca Skloot. Excerpted by permission of Crown Publishing Group, a division of Random House LLC, a Penguin Random House Company. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.

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Rebecca Skloot

    Rebecca Skloot is an award-winning science writer who contributes to The New York Times Magazine, NPR’s RadioLab and others. She is the author of the #1 New York Times bestseller, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, which has been translated into more than 25 languages and is being made into an HBO film produced by Oprah Winfrey and Alan Ball. Skloot lives in Chicago, where she is writing a book about animals and ethics. For more info: Rebeccaskloot.com You can also find Rebecca on Twitter @rebeccaskloot and on Facebook.