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 Tour Kamchatka

People (indigenous)

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A Koryak reindeer herder teaches his son to use the lasso. The Koryaks, one of several indigenous groups in Kamchatka, live on the tundra in the northern part of the peninsula. They follow their reindeer herds, which move periodically to seek fresh supplies of the reindeer moss that is their principal fodder. The lasso is the Koryak's single most important tool, used from on foot to capture individual deer. This requires skill and teamwork, as one person can only slow down the animal after lassoing its horns; others must then lasso its feet by laying a loop where the animal will step. Horns like the rack seen in this photo are sawn off of rutting bulls to protect the reindeer from hurting one another during the rutting season. The horns are eventually sold, ground up, and sold again as aphrodisiacs.

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