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Dirty Bomb

Links & Books

 

Dirty Bomb homepage


Links

Terrorism Questions and Answers
www.terrorismanswers.com/weapons/dirtybomb.html
The Council on Foreign Relations offers an exhaustive collection of materials on chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear terrorism. The site's information on dirty bombs is authoritative and easy to understand.


Federation of American Scientists (FAS)
www.fas.org/terrorism/index.html
The FAS Web site maintains a constantly updated cache of pages on terrorism, which include information on radiological terrorism. You'll find basic information on radiological materials, the full text of FAS President Dr. Henry Kelly's recent testimony on dirty bombs and nuclear terrorism before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, and much more.


International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
www.iaea.org
For accurate information on controlling radioactive sources that is updated almost daily, visit the IAEA's Web site. The site's content is well organized and well written.


Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)
www.nrc.gov
Find out what steps the U.S. Government is taking to protect its citizens against radioactive materials, in terms of terrorist attacks, radioactive waste, and lost materials.


Center for Nonproliferation Studies (CNS)
cns.miis.edu
You may find significantly more than you were looking for, but the CNS at the Monterey Institute for International Studies maintains scores of databases on nearly every event related to loose radiological material. These databases might prove particularly useful for a researcher with specific interests.



Books

One Point Safe
by Andrew and Leslie Cockburn. New York: Anchor Press, 1997.
Veteran journalists Andrew and Leslie Cockburn plunder the vaults of the American National Security Council and the Russian Ministry of Defense to reveal the true story of widespread nuclear smuggling throughout the world. Their gripping narrative weaves classified documents and the personal stories of the men and women on the front lines of these events.


The Spread of Nuclear Weapons: A Debate Renewed
by Scott D. Sagan and Kenneth N. Walz. New York: W.W. Norton, 2002.
In their concise and engaging new book, this pair of professor/authors comments on the new threat of nuclear war and nuclear terrorism, continuing the well-known Cold War dialogue and updating it for the present climate of novice nuclear states like India and Pakistan and unsecured nuclear assets in the former Soviet Union and elsewhere.


Avoiding Nuclear Anarchy: Containing the Threat of Loose Russian Nuclear Weapons and Fissile Material
by Graham T. Allison, ed. Cambridge: MIT Press, 1998.
Assistant Secretary of Defense in the first Clinton administration, Graham Allison (see Preparing for Terrorism) and three colleagues at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government examine the danger of "loose nukes" in Russia today and propose realistic and practical solutions.


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