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Building a Cleaner Battery

  • Teacher Resource
  • Posted 01.12.12
  • NOVA

In this video excerpt from NOVA's "Making Stuff: Cleaner" with host and New York Times technology columnist David Pogue, learn how materials scientists are designing new kinds of batteries that could power the next generation of electric vehicles. Watch one of the world's fastest electric motorcycles, powered by the equivalent of 150 car batteries, accelerate to 60 mph in less than one second. In a related activity, students build their own environmentally cleaner batteries using common materials while learning about batteries, circuits, issues surrounding battery disposal, and the efforts of materials scientists to build cleaner batteries.

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Supplemental Media Available: Making Stuff Cleaner Activity (Document); What Is Materials Science? (Document)

NOVA Building a Cleaner Battery
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  • Media Type: Video
  • Running Time: 1m 36s
  • Size: 5.0 MB
  • Level: Grades 6-12

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This media asset was adapted from NOVA's "Making Stuff: Cleaner".

Resource Produced by:


					WGBH Educational Foundation

Collection Developed by:


						WGBH Educational Foundation

Collection Funded by:


						National Science Foundation

						U.S. Department of Energy



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