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Judgment Day: Intelligent Design on Trial

Viewing Ideas

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Before Watching

  1. Ask students to describe the nature of science and the process by which scientists investigate the natural world. Define "hypothesis" and "theory" for students and have them come up with examples of each (see The Nature of Science).

  2. Organize students into three groups. Assign each group to take notes on one of the following program topics: evidence supporting intelligent design as a scientific theory, evidence that ID is not a scientific theory, and evidence supporting the theory of evolution.


After Watching

  1. Have each group meet and create a synopsis of its notes to present to class. What was the judge's final decision? Discuss his ruling with the class. What evidence did he base his decision on?

  2. Ask students to describe some of the characteristics of science. (Science is a systematic form of inquiry, based on observation, prediction, reasoning, and testing, that seeks to explain how the natural universe works. Scientific hypotheses can be tested and experimental results reproduced or observations repeated.) What kinds of questions do scientists ask? (A biologist might ask, "How do bees find pollen? When do they collect it? How do they find their way back to the hive? What is the pollen used for?") Would an investigation into animal migration be science? The predictions of an astrologer? The decoding of the human genome? Psychic mind-reading? Why or why not?

Teacher's Guide
Judgment Day: Intelligent Design on Trial
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