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Kvant-1 Jerry Linenger heads into Kvant-1.

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Take a Tour of Mir
Kvant-1
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You enter Kvant-1, the "Astrophysics module," by floating through the rear tunnel of the Core Module. Launched in March 1987, Kvant-1 was Core Module's first companion, and was originally intended to provide information for research into the physics of active galaxies, quasars, and neutron stars by measuring electromagnetic spectra and X-ray emissions. Kvant-1 is 19 feet long and 14 feet in diameter and consists of three separate areas. The first area you enter, coming from Core Module, is the short forward transfer tunnel. Beyond that, the main lab compartment was originally meant to house the controls for scientific apparatus. Finally, a longer tunnel leads to the rear-facing docking drogue, where the Progress cargo-supply spacecraft docks. This area is now referred to as the "attic," as it is used as a staging area to move material to be sent back to Earth into the Progress.

Kvant-1 also has six gyrodynes—magnetically suspended flywheel control-moment gyroscopes, spun in pairs at 10,000rpm, one pair on each of three cartesian axes. These convert electricity from solar panels into torque in order to orient the entire Mir complex without using fuel.

Map of Mir/Kvant-1

Footage: NASA.

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