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Anatomy of a Cuttlefish

  • By Rima Chaddha
  • Posted 04.03.07
  • NOVA

Cuttlefish have abilities and senses that are alien to us humans. They can change their appearance in a split second, mimicking floating vegetation or rocks on the seafloor. When danger looms, cuttlefish also can jet away at great speeds, shooting out a smoke screen of ink. How do they accomplish all this? Here, examine the anatomy of this octopus relative and learn how this master of disguise performs its tricks.

Launch Interactive Printable Version

Blue-green blood? Three hearts? Explore what sets cuttlefish apart from other animals.

Credits

Images

(cuttlefish, arm & tentacle, beak, cuttlebone, eye, fin, gill, ink sac, mantle, mating, skin)
© James B. Wood/ www.thecephalopodpage.org
(brain/lateral lines)
©1988/2007 Bernd U. Budelmann, University of Texas Medical Branc

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  • Spineless Smarts

    Animal behaviorist Jean Boal ponders what cephalopods might teach us about our own intellect.

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