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Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions

General

RSS

Technical Help

Transcripts


General

Q: What is NOVA scienceNOW?

A: NOVA scienceNOW is a new series produced by NOVA. It airs five times a year in the NOVA broadcast timeslot (Tuesdays at 8 PM ET on PBS in most areas). Each magazine-style episode consists of several segments covering a wide variety of cutting-edge science topics. Astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson hosts the program, which is reported by a team of correspondents in the field. To find out more, visit the About the Series page.

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Q: How do I purchase a NOVA scienceNOW video or DVD?

A: Many NOVA scienceNOW episodes are available on DVD. Not every program has been licensed for home video use, however. A complete list of NOVA programs available for purchase can be found in the NOVA section of the WGBH online shop. All available videos can also be purchased by calling WGBH Videos at 1-800-949-8670 x498.

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Q: When will a particular episode repeat?

A: Because each local PBS station determines its own repeat schedule, you should check the television schedule for your area. You can do this by visiting the PBS TV Schedules page, by checking television listings in your local newspaper, or by calling your local PBS station. You can also watch the entire episode online on this site at any time following the broadcast.

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Q: How can I find out what's coming up on NOVA scienceNOW?

A: The NOVA scienceNOW Web site will be regularly updated with dispatches from the production team and Web stories on upcoming topics. Check back regularly online and sign up for the NOVA scienceNOW e-mail newsletter to receive e-mail notices about upcoming T.V. episodes and Web stories. You can also subscribe to our Really Simple Syndication (RSS) feed, which will keep you updated as we post each new Web story online. For more information on RSS, visit our RSS page. To subscribe to the NOVA scienceNOW RSS feed, visit our Subscribe page.

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Q: I'm having technical difficulties using the NOVA scienceNOW Web site. Where can I find help?

A:See the Technical Help below. For more about how to change the font size of NOVA scienceNOW Web pages for easier viewing, how to install and troubleshoot video and audio plugins, and more, visit the Technical Help page.

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Q: How can I find out more about series host Neil deGrasse Tyson?

A: To read about Neil deGrasse Tyson's career and his thoughts about his role as NOVA scienceNOW's host and executive editor, About the Series Host page.

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Q: Where can I find NOVA scienceNOW transcripts?

A: Full transcripts of each broadcast will be available on the NOVA scienceNOW Transcripts page within one week after each episode airs.

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Q: Can you send me information on a particular topic featured in a NOVA scienceNOW episode?

A: Because of the high volume of correspondence NOVA scienceNOW receives, we cannot answer individual requests for information or research assistance on a particular topic of interest. Wherever possible, we list related books, articles, and sites on the NOVA scienceNOW companion Web site for those interested in learning more about the topics covered on air and online.

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Q: How can I contact an expert or other person featured in a NOVA scienceNOW episode?

A: Though we cannot provide contact information for NOVA scienceNOW program participants, we will pass your questions and comments on to the appropriate staff, who will respond at their discretion. Send e-mail to:

nova at wgbh dot org

or snail mail to:

NOVA scienceNOW
WGBH Educational Foundation
One Guest Street
Boston, MA 02135

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Q: How can I send feedback about the NOVA scienceNOW series or the companion Web site?

A: We welcome your feedback. If you have a comment about an episode, a correction to suggest, or even a story suggestion for the producers of the broadcast series or Web site, please send it in using our Feedback page.

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Q: I would like to use an image, video clip, audio clip, or text piece from the NOVA scienceNOW Web site on my own Web site, in a print publication, or in a presentation. Can I have permission to do so?

A: The contents of the NOVA scienceNOW Web site are copyrighted to WGBH, the producer of NOVA, or to third-party licensors. You may not reproduce any contents from the NOVA Web site without receiving formal permission. To inquire about permissions, please send an e-mail to:

nova at wgbh dot org

Be sure to include in your e-mail a link to the page where the material you are interested in can be found.

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Q: I am a teacher. Where can I find NOVA scienceNOW resources for teachers?

A: On the For Educators section of our Web site you will find teacher's guides, links to distributed computing projects, information on how to create a NOVA scienceNOW bulletin in your classroom, daily science news, and other educator resources. Also, please note that educators may tape NOVA scienceNOW broadcasts off the air and use them in the classroom for a period of one year.

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Q: Are there any events planned in my area that are related to NOVA scienceNOW?

A: The NOVA scienceNOW outreach team will be coordinating ways for viewers to get involved in NOVA's new series all over the country. To find out what the outreach team is working on, visit the Get Involved page.

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Technical Help

Get Flash Q: How do I get the free Flash software?

A: If you don't already have the Flash plugin (a "plugin" is a piece of software), you can download it, free of charge, from Macromedia. It takes just a few minutes to download it onto your hard disk and install it. From then on, it will open automatically whenever you access Flash content, wherever you are on the Web. The Flash plugin allows you to experience interactive multimedia, including audio, video, animations, puzzles, and the like, through your Web browser.

More about Flash
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Get QuickTime Q: How do I get the free QuickTime software?

A: If you don't already have the QuickTime plugin (a "plugin" is a piece of software), you can download it, free of charge, from Apple Computer. It takes just a few minutes to download it onto your hard disk and install it. From then on, it will open automatically whenever you access QuickTime movies or QuickTime VRs (often shown as "QTVR"), wherever you are on the Web.

More about QuickTime
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Q: The video window opens and the video begins to play, but then my browser crashes. What is going on?

A: This seems to happen for viewers who use Windows 98/Me/2000/XP and have QuickTime 6.5 or greater (6.5, 6.5.1, or 6.5.2) installed on their system. It appears to be the result of a bug in QuickTime 6.5.x for Windows, and we've notified Apple of the problem. As far as we can tell, earlier versions of QuickTime for Windows (6.4 etc.) do not have this bug.

More about QuickTime
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Get RealPlayer plugin Q: How do I get the free RealPlayer software?

A: If you don't already have RealPlayer, you can download it, free of charge, from Real. It takes just a few minutes to download it onto your hard disk and install it. From then on, it will open automatically whenever you access RealVideo or RealAudio content, wherever you are on the Web.

More about RealPlayer
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Q: How do I view captions in RealPlayer?

A: Close any browser windows that are displaying Web pages with embedded RealVideo. Open the RealPlayer application. From the "Tools" menu, select "Preferences" and then "Content." (If the RealPlayer application opens as a small window, you might have to enlarge the window in order to see the full menu.) In the "Content" pane, under "Accessibility" at the bottom of the pane, check the "use supplemental text captioning if available" box if it is not already checked. Quit RealPlayer, return to your browser, and try another RV clip.

More about RealPlayer
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Q: How do I get the free Windows Media Player software?

A: The Windows Media file format allows you to listen to sound files, watch video clips, and view multimedia presentations.

For Microsoft Windows users, viewing Windows Media requires Windows Media Player, available for free download from Microsoft.

For Macintosh OS X users, viewing Windows Media requires the installation of Windows Media Components for QuickTime by Flip4Mac, also available for free download from Microsoft.

More about Windows Media
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Q: How do I view captions in Windows Media Player?

A: Close any browser windows that are displaying Web pages with embedded Windows Media. Open the Windows Media Player application. Right-click on the control bar, and from the resulting popup menu, select "Play," then "Captions and Subtitles," and "On if available." Quit Windows Media Player, return to your browser, and try another Windows Media clip.

More about Windows Media
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Q: When I click on a link, nothing happens.

A: You probably have popup blocking in place, preventing video or other popup windows from opening. Adjust your popup blocking (in your browser, from your ISP, or in other popup-blocking software) to allow requested popup windows.

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