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Tour the Solar System

  • Posted 04.21.11
  • NOVA

Warning: For those wanna-be astronauts and space travelers out there, this interactive model of the solar system could prove to be highly addictive. With one click, you can visit Saturn, Venus, or the other planets and then spin and explore them in three dimensions. The interface uses NASA calculations to precisely position all celestial bodies. Click the play button at the bottom of the screen to watch the positions of the planets and moon change as time passes. If you're impatient, you can click ahead to see how the stars align in the year 2100.

Launch Interactive

Explore the planets, visit the moon, and gaze at the stars in this 3-D interactive model of the solar system.

Editor's Note: The size of the planets, moon, and stars as well as the distance between these celestial bodies can be adjusted using the settings feature. Select "true" to view accurate size and distance or "schematic" to view in a more visually engaging presentation.

Credits

Credits

Interface created by
Solar System Scope
Introduction written by
Kristine Allington

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