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Right. You're not "thrown" in any direction. What happens is that your body continues going in the same direction (straight) even though the car you're in is turning. So you, on your straight path, collide with the car door on its turning path. Hence it seems as if you are being thrown against the door.

If your friend were to drive really quickly in a tight circle, your inclination would still be to keep moving straight, so it would seem as though you were being pushed into the door the whole time. This effect is caused by centripetal force, which keeps pushing you toward the center of the circle, while your body keeps trying to move in a straight line. Centripetal force is what actually pushes you into the turn. It is often mistaken for centrifugal force, which is actually not a force at all.

OK. So what does careening around corners in cars have to do with the forces fighter pilots feel?





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