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Sinking City of Venice

Links & Books

 

Venice homepage


Links

Safeguarding of Venice and its Lagoon
www.salve.it/uk/default.htm
Browse a glossary of useful terms related to Venice and its lagoon, review a database featuring a myriad of proposed solutions to Venice's flooding, read current news reports about the progress of safeguarding Venice, find answers to frequently asked questions about the efforts to protect Venice, and more.


Save Venice
www.savevenice.org/
Since 1967, Save Venice, an American organization, has worked to restore and protect Venice's threatened artistic and architectural treasures. At the Save Venice Web site, learn more about the project's dozens of restoration projects, view maps and photographs of Venice, and find schedules for Save Venice lectures in New York and around the world.


Cities on Water
brezza.iuav.it/citiesonwater/
Venice is not the only waterside city threatened by floods. Visit the Web site of the International Center of Cities on Water and learn more about other cities tenuously perched by seas, lakes, and rivers.



Books

Venice Against the Sea: A City Besieged
by John Keahey. New York: Dunne Books, 2002.
Journalist John Keahey (see Weighing the Solutions) offers a detailed account of why Venice is sinking and a thorough review of what could be done with clever engineering and oversight to save the city.


A History of Venice
by John Julius Norwich. New York: Vintage Books, 1989.
This popular and comprehensive survey of Venice's long history will appeal to history buffs and Venice lovers alike. Beginning in the Roman period and continuing through Napoleon's surrender, Norwich provides a fascinating background for the unique and enthralling modern Venice we know today.


Tides: A Scientific History
by David Edgar Cartwright. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2001.
Humans have pondered how the tides work for millennia. Cartwright presents the history of these musings, from the Greeks to Descartes and Bacon, among others, and he includes photographs and illustrations of an array of scientific equipment developed for the study of the tides.


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