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Mountain of Ice

Links & Books

 

Mountain of Ice homepage


Links

Introduction to Paleoclimatology
www.ngdc.noaa.gov/paleo/primer.html
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is working with scientists around the world to study climate variability and change. On this site, find out why and how paleoclimatologists study climate and learn more about Antarctica's important role in this field.


National Public Radio's Journey to Antarctica
www.wbur.org/special/antarctica/
Check in daily with writer and producer Dan Grossman as he reports to NPR during a five-week trip to Antarctica in early 2003. Read journal entries and browse Grossman's photo galleries.


Glacier
www.glacier.rice.edu
Search this site for facts and statistics on Antarctica, the nitty gritty of glaciers, and lists of related books, films, Web sites, and more.


Shackleton's Voyage of Endurance
www.pbs.org/nova/shackleton
Explore our own massive site on Ernest Shackleton's 1914-1916 Antarctic odyssey. The NOVA site includes both a range of historical material related to Shackleton and other polar explorers as well as photographs and panoramas of the continent today, shot by a NOVA crew during an April 2000 online adventure.


Adventure Network International
www.adventure-network.com
Visit the Web site of the private tour company that flew NOVA's crew to its destinations in Antarctica and provided an initial base for them during the making of "Mountain of Ice."



Books

The Last Place on Earth
by Roland Huntford. New York: Random House, 1999.
Biographer Roland Huntford describes the race between Norway's Roald Amundsen and England's Robert Falcon Scott to claim the South Pole. Huntford's popular and well-written book debunks many myths about Scott and claims that Amundsen deserves more credit for his feat than he usually gets.


The South Pole
by Roald Amundsen. Phoenix, Arizona: Copper Square Press, 2001.
Read the tale as told by Amundsen himself. Originally published as two volumes in 1913, this recent edition has been repackaged into a single book with a foreword written by biographer Roland Huntford.


Antarctica and the Antarctic: The Complete Encyclopedia
by David McGonigal et al. Toronto: Firefly Books, 2001
This beautifully illustrated 608-page tome covers the last place on Earth's geology, geography, wildlife, human life, and exploration history in great detail. It comes with a CD-ROM for an interactive exploration of the book's topics.


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