Press Release: A Harrowing Original Story of Neighbor Against Neighbor Along Syria’s Front Line

 FRONTLINE Presents
Syria Behind the Lines
Tuesday, April 9, 2013, at 10 p.m. on PBS
www.pbs.org/frontline/Syria-Behind-the-Lines
www.facebook.com/frontline
Twitter: @frontlinepbs #frontline

The world has watched Syria’s agony from a distance. For tens of thousands of Syrians, though, the civil war is unfolding with intimate horror: families destroyed in an instant; once-peaceful villages ripped apart by sectarian rage; neighbors confronting neighbors across a no man’s land of hatred, suspicion and terror.

FRONTLINE’s Olly Lambert is the first Western filmmaker to spend an extended period living on both sides of Syria’s war—and to document, on camera, the realities of everyday life for rebels, government soldiers and the civilians who support them. Syria Behind the Lines is an unforgettable portrait of a disintegrating nation and of the dividing lines between communities and between life and death. The program airs Tuesday, April 9, at 10 p.m. on PBS (check local listings).

For five weeks in October and November 2012, Lambert crisscrossed the Orontes River valley in Idlib province, a once-peaceful area in Syria’s heartland that is now a perilous sectarian front line. On one side of the river, the rebel Free Syrian Army holds Sunni villages whose residents are calling for the fall of President Bashar al-Assad. On the other side, less than a mile away, villagers from Assad’s Alawite minority remain fiercely loyal to the government and gladly host army checkpoints that fire shells and mortars into neighboring Sunni villages.

In the regime-held village of Aziziya, we meet schoolchildren who chant, “Whatever Syria requires of us, we are ready, boys and girls,” as well as loyalist villagers and Ba’ath Party members. We enter checkpoints where Assad’s army carries out its shelling, meeting Syrian Army commanders—including one who mans the gun position that had fired on Lambert and a Sunni farmer only weeks before.

Across the river, in the rebel-held village of Kansafra, Lambert lives in the very houses the regime is targeting. Here we meet farmers who are shot at when they try to check their crops, and a young rebel soldier who used to think nothing of crossing the river to play with the friends he is now fighting: “We used to be like brothers before the revolution,” he says. In the village, too, are refugees who came to Kansafra seeking safe haven but found nothing of the sort. Instead, they are left to grieve as their families become the latest victims of regime shelling. In a devastating sequence, Lambert films a regime air strike that hits civilian homes barely 300 yards from where he is standing, killing 17 people, mostly unarmed women and children.

Both sides in the conflict think they are working to make the country safe for their families and for the future. Both sides blame each other for the death, destruction and fighting. Both sides express longing for a return to peace. And, as Syria Behind the Lines reveals in stark, gripping detail, both sides believe that peace can only be achieved if they are the victors.

Credits

Syria Behind the Lines is a Quicksilver Media production for WGBH/FRONTLINE and Channel 4. The writer, director and producer is Olly Lambert. The executive producer is Eamonn Matthews. The deputy executive producer of FRONTLINE is Raney Aronson-Rath. The executive producer of FRONTLINE is David Fanning.

About FRONTLINE

FRONTLINE explores the issues of our times through powerful investigative storytelling. FRONTLINE is produced by WGBH Boston and is broadcast nationwide on PBS. Funding for FRONTLINE is provided through the support of PBS viewers and by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Major funding for FRONTLINE is provided by The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. Additional funding is provided by the Park Foundation and by the FRONTLINE Journalism Fund. FRONTLINE is closed-captioned for deaf and hard-of-hearing viewers by the Media Access Group at WGBH. FRONTLINE is a registered trademark of the WGBH Educational Foundation.

Press Contacts for FRONTLINE

Patrice Taddonio, (617) 300-5375, patrice_taddonio@wgbh.org
Diane Hebert-Farrell, (617) 300-5366, diane_hebert_farrell@wgbh.org

pbs.org/pressroom: Download promotional photography from the PBS Pressroom.

blog comments powered by Disqus

In order to foster a civil and literate discussion that respects all participants, FRONTLINE has the following guidelines for commentary. By submitting comments here, you are consenting to these rules:

Readers' comments that include profanity, obscenity, personal attacks, harassment, or are defamatory, sexist, racist, violate a third party's right to privacy, or are otherwise inappropriate, will be removed. Entries that are unsigned or are "signed" by someone other than the actual author will be removed. We reserve the right to not post comments that are more than 400 words. We will take steps to block users who repeatedly violate our commenting rules, terms of use, or privacy policies. You are fully responsible for your comments.

SUPPORT PROVIDED BY

FRONTLINE on

ShopPBS
Frontline Journalism Fund

Supporting Investigative Reporting

Funding for FRONTLINE is provided through the support of PBS viewers and by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Major funding for FRONTLINE is provided by John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. Additional funding is provided by the Park Foundation, the Ford Foundation, Wyncote Foundation, and the FRONTLINE Journalism Fund with major support from Jon and Jo Ann Hagler on behalf of the Jon L. Hagler Foundation.
PBSCPBMacArthur FoundationPark FoundationFord Foundationwyncote

FRONTLINE   Watch FRONTLINE   About FRONTLINE   Contact FRONTLINE
Privacy Policy   Journalistic Guidelines   PBS Privacy Policy   PBS Terms of Use   Corporate Sponsorship
FRONTLINE is a registered trademark of WGBH Educational Foundation.
Web Site Copyright ©1995-2014 WGBH Educational Foundation
PBS is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization.