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  • The Roadshow Archive

    Lone Ranger & Tonto Dolls, ca. 1930

    Appraised Value:

    $2,000 (1998)

    Updated Value:

    $1,000 - $1,200 (2012)

    Appraised on: August 1, 1998

    Appraised in: Los Angeles, California

    Appraised by: Noel Barrett

    Category: Dolls

    Episode Info: Los Angeles (#1722)
    Los Angeles (#304)

    Originally Aired: February 8, 1999

    slideshow IMAGE: 1 of 3 Next 

    More Like This:

    Form: Original Box, Action Figure
    Material: Composite
    Period / Style: 20th Century
    Value Range: $2,000 (1998)
    Updated Value: $1,000 - $1,200 (2012)

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    Comment

    Appraisal Video: (1:41)

    appraiser

    Appraised By:

    Noel Barrett
    Toys & Games
    Owner
    Noel Barrett Antiques & Auctions Ltd.

    Appraisal Transcript:
    GUEST: Originally, they were my father's. He got them for Christmas when he was nine years old, 1938.

    APPRAISER: Well, the Lone Ranger was one of the great radio shows in the 1930s. And in the 1950s, it was one of the first of the national television shows. One of the great western characters and one of the great characters of American popular culture. And what you have here are just two remarkable dolls. Tonto, his faithful Indian companion, the Lone Ranger here. What's intriguing is these dolls came with so many accessories. And what is so rare is when you have all of them together. Even the hat with the paper hat band has survived saying, "Lone Ranger." You have the original string tag. You have Tonto's rubber knife. You have the original cap guns. Even his badge. You even have remnants of an original box, with the original price of $3.50. It's very rare to find these dolls in that kind of condition. Especially considering that the dolls themselves were made out of composition, which is like, basically, pressed sawdust and glue. So they're in a remarkable state of preservation. The last Lone Ranger I've heard of selling at auction in the original box brought $1,300.

    GUEST: By itself?

    APPRAISER: By itself.

    GUEST: Oh, boy.

    APPRAISER: So now you have the Lone Ranger and Tonto. I'd say the pair on today's market would easily bring $2,000.

    GUEST: Wow.



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