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    Tiffany Aquamarine Glass Vase

    Appraised Value:

    $30,000 - $40,000 (1998)

    Updated Value:

    $90,000 - $100,000 (2012)

    Appraised on: August 22, 1998

    Appraised in: Hartford, Connecticut

    Appraised by: Arlie Sulka

    Category: Glass

    Episode Info: Hartford (#1726)
    Hartford (#316)

    Originally Aired: May 31, 1999

    slideshow IMAGE: 1 of 1  

    More Like This:

    Form: Vase
    Material: Glass
    Period / Style: 20th Century
    Value Range: $30,000 - $40,000 (1998)
    Updated Value: $90,000 - $100,000 (2012)

    Related Links:

    Understanding Our Appraisals
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    Comment

    Appraisal Video: (1:44)

    appraiser

    Appraised By:

    Arlie Sulka
    Glass
    Owner
    Lillian Nassau, LLC

    Appraisal Transcript:
    GUEST: In the 1930s, my parents went to an estate sale in New Haven, Connecticut, and they bought it. And I know that they didn't pay much money for it, because they didn't have any money. It's been in the family for over 60 years.

    APPRAISER: That's wonderful. This particular glass was made at Tiffany in around 1914. Tiffany was owned and operated by Louis Comfort Tiffany, who was the son of Charles Tiffany, the founder of Tiffany and Company. This particular glass is called aquamarine glass. It was produced for a very short period of time. The glass resembles seawater. And when they first made this, they put a lot of aquatic life in it. Later on, they added flowers to it. This piece is signed on the bottom. It says "L.C. Tiffany Favrile," and then there is a number also on the bottom. Although the piece is signed, it doesn't always mean that it is Tiffany. But only Tiffany made aquamarine glass. It was such a difficult technique that no one has been able to replicate it. This was very costly to make because a lot of the pieces broke. At the time, they would sell these for between $200 and $250, and there were very few made. Your piece of glass is worth between $30,000 and $40,000. Pretty good.



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