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  • The Roadshow Archive

    Mormon Certificate of Gratitude

    Appraised Value:

    $10,000 - $15,000 (1999)

    Updated Value:

    $25,000 - $30,000 (2013)

    Appraised on: July 10, 1999

    Appraised in: Salt Lake City, Utah

    Appraised by: Peter Curran

    Category: Books & Manuscripts

    Episode Info: Salt Lake City (#1830)
    Salt Lake City (#414)

    Originally Aired: May 1, 2000

    slideshow IMAGE: 1 of 5 Next 

    More Like This:

    Form: Document
    Material: Parchment
    Value Range: $10,000 - $15,000 (1999)
    Updated Value: $25,000 - $30,000 (2013)

    Related Links:

    Understanding Our Appraisals
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    Comment

    Appraisal Video: (1:27)

    appraiser

    Appraised By:

    Peter Curran
    Decorative Arts, Folk Art, Furniture, Paintings & Drawings, Silver

    Appraisal Transcript:
    GUEST: The person designated above here is my great-great-grandfather. I don't know exactly how the document came down, but my grandmother tells me it was found in some attic and then became my grandfather's.

    APPRAISER: He was a missionary that went to London and then came back to Salt Lake City?

    GUEST: Yes.

    APPRAISER: Now, what we have appears to be almost a thank-you certificate or an award from his church members in England. It's to "the elder Jacob Gates," and he seems to have been well liked by not only one particular group, but by several groups in England. Here we have presidents of the conferences in London, in Kent, in Reading and Essex. He clearly made quite a large impact over there. Here it says he baptized over 1,400 souls, that he had over 4,000 members in his group. He was clearly a highly admired person. It's all done in hand calligraphy on parchment, and it's hand-colored. Graphically, it's very intriguing. It's very unusual. They certainly don't appear much on the East Coast in the marketplace. I think in terms of a fair market value, I would say $10,000 to $15,000.

    GUEST: That would surprise me. I wouldn't have thought anything like that.



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