Visit Your Local PBS Station PBS Home PBS Home Programs A-Z TV Schedules Watch Video Donate Shop PBS Search PBS

SUPPORT PROVIDED BY

Support ANTIQUES ROADSHOW by supporting public television! Give Today
  • ON TV
  • ON TOUR
  • WATCH ONLINE
  • WEB EXCLUSIVES
  • RESOURCES
  • SHOP
  • The Roadshow Archive

    Tabriz Carpet, ca. 1900

    Appraised Value:

    $25,000

    Appraised on: June 25, 2005

    Appraised in: Tampa, Florida

    Appraised by: Peter Pap

    Category: Rugs & Textiles

    Episode Info: Tampa, Hour 3 (#1003)

    Originally Aired: January 23, 2006

    slideshow IMAGE: 1 of 1  

    More Like This:

    Form: Rug
    Material: Wool
    Value Range: $25,000

    Related Links:

    Understanding Our Appraisals
    Useful tips to keep in mind when watching ANTIQUES ROADSHOW

    Comment

    Appraisal Video: (2:59)

    appraiser

    Appraised By:

    Peter Pap
    Rugs & Textiles

    Peter Pap Oriental Rugs of San Francisco, Inc.

    Appraisal Transcript:
    GUEST: Well, it belonged to my great-grandmother, who lived in Milwaukee on the lakeshore. And then, when the house was torn down, they moved and then gave the rug to my grandmother. Her house was west of Milwaukee.

    APPRAISER: Shown here in the photograph?

    GUEST: That, I think, was taken in the late '20s or '30s.

    APPRAISER: Well, it s always great to have documentation like this. We know at least that it's from 1920.

    GUEST: Oh, yes, yes...

    APPRAISER: This is a Tabriz carpet woven in northwest Persia. And it emulates the style of the classical carpets that were woven in the late 16th and early 17th Century. It's about a nine by 12. And being from about 1900, it's right about when the revival of weaving in Persia was getting in full swing. And they take certain design elements from the classical carpet. But because it's being made 200 or 300 years later, it has its own feeling for the market of that day, because these were being woven for export. So, this cartouche that we see here at the top of the medallion probably would have originally had writing in it.

    GUEST: Oh, really?

    APPRAISER: But they've just done floral decoration now. The beautiful scalloped medallion exhibits some of the earth tones that are in the carpet, which are indicative of an earlier date. The later carpets would have been woven with synthetic dyes and would have been much more harsh.

    GUEST: Ohh... Is this natural dye?

    APPRAISER: Many of these dyes are natural. It's in a transition period where some are natural and some are synthetic. But overall, the feeling is with earth tones, and that's what's important for today's market. If you move down here, one of the most interesting aspects are the animals in the carpet, which go back to the early classical hunting carpets. And these animals also appeared in the miniature paintings from that same period. Now, the early examples also had riders on horseback that were shooting arrows.

    GUEST: Oh, my.

    APPRAISER: But, again, that has dropped out the design in this particular carpet. It's very finely woven.

    GUEST: It's wool?

    APPRAISER: It's all wool. It's in wonderful condition. I can't believe the condition that it's in. I can't find any worn spots.

    GUEST: Oh, my.

    APPRAISER: So you've certainly taken good care of it.

    GUEST: We did have it moth-proofed.

    APPRAISER: Well, that's good. I don't see any evidence of moth damage or wear.

    GUEST: Oh, my.

    APPRAISER: If I had this in my gallery, I would sell it for $25,000.

    GUEST: Oh, my, really?

    APPRAISER: Yes.

    GUEST: Oh... Wow.

    APPRAISER: This is a retail or replacement value.

    GUEST: Oh, well... I thought maybe $5,000. Well, I'm glad I brought it in.

    APPRAISER: I'm glad you did, too.



    WGBH This website is produced for PBS Online by WGBH Boston. ©1997-2014 WGBH Educational Foundation.
    ANTIQUES ROADSHOW is a trademark of the BBC and is produced for PBS by WGBH under license from BBC Worldwide.
    WGBH and PBS are not responsible for the content of websites linked to or from ANTIQUES ROADSHOW Online.
    PBS is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization.

    ROADSHOW on Facebook ROADSHOW Tweets ROADSHOW on YouTube