Visit Your Local PBS Station PBS Home PBS Home Programs A-Z TV Schedules Watch Video Donate Shop PBS Search PBS

SUPPORT PROVIDED BY

Support ANTIQUES ROADSHOW by supporting public television! Give Today
  • ON TV
  • ON TOUR
  • WATCH ONLINE
  • WEB EXCLUSIVES
  • RESOURCES
  • SHOP
  • The Roadshow Archive

    Ansonia La Cette Clock, ca. 1905

    Appraised Value:

    $1,200

    Appraised on: July 30, 2005

    Appraised in: Bismarck, North Dakota

    Appraised by: John Delaney

    Category: Clocks & Watches

    Episode Info: Bismarck, Hour 1 (#1010)

    Originally Aired: April 10, 2006

    slideshow IMAGE: 1 of 1  

    More Like This:

    Form: Shelf Clock
    Material: Porcelain
    Period / Style: 20th Century
    Value Range: $1,200

    Related Links:

    Understanding Our Appraisals
    Useful tips to keep in mind when watching ANTIQUES ROADSHOW

    Comment

    Appraisal Video: (2:38)

    appraiser

    Appraised By:

    John Delaney
    Clocks & Watches

    Delaney's Antique Clocks

    Appraisal Transcript:
    GUEST: I inherited it from my father, who inherited it from his mother, my grandmother. I've had it for about maybe 30 years.

    APPRAISER: And do you know anything about it?

    GUEST: No, except that it was assumed that maybe my grandmother got it as a wedding present, because she had two of them.

    APPRAISER: Really?

    GUEST: The other one went to my aunt.

    APPRAISER: The other one look like this?

    GUEST: It was brownish. I don't remember too much about it, except that it was brown.

    APPRAISER: Well, the movement was actually made in New York City by the Ansonia Clock Company.

    GUEST: Uh-huh.

    APPRAISER: And it's a little unusual in that the case is actually made in Germany. The case would have been brought to this country from Germany, and cased in this country. So it's actually sold as an American clock. And we know that because it says it right here on the back.

    GUEST: Yeah.

    APPRAISER: It says "Royal Bonn Germany." Now, that's a big deal on a clock like this. A lot of people who collect these types of china clocks or porcelain cases look for this particular stamp. And what that means is that this case is decorated a little bit finer than the American versions. It's advertised in the first Ansonia catalogs as being made in 1905. And this particular clock, they make a big deal out of it being decorated in what is called new-age tints. And I think that refers to the really brilliant coloring of the decoration here. You'll also notice that it has a porcelain dial. Porcelain dials don't fade, and as a result, always stay really a nice, white, bone color. And the numerals really stand out quite nicely from that. This actually has a model name. And collectors of this type of clock collect the models. This particular one is called La Cette. It's a French name; I'm probably butchering the pronunciation. You said this clock isn't working correctly when we spoke earlier.

    GUEST: It was working until my husband was winding it, and he felt a certain tension, and that was the chime part.

    APPRAISER: Well, one of the other issues with this clock is condition. This particular clock doesn't have any chips on it and as a result is in very nice condition. And when I looked in the back, I noticed that the mainspring was broken on the strike side. If you were to spend $150 or $200 to get that repaired and used the clock every day, it would add value to the clock, because it would make it easier to sell. A clock like this would probably sell for about $1,200 in my shop.

    GUEST: Oh, really? (chuckles) Well, now, isn't that something? And my kids used to laugh at me every time I took it down to the bathroom in the basement when there was a tornado warning.

    APPRAISER: Really? Well, it was well worth doing that, wasn't it?

    GUEST: Yeah. Oh, I'm jumping.



    WGBH This website is produced for PBS Online by WGBH Boston. ©1997-2014 WGBH Educational Foundation.
    ANTIQUES ROADSHOW is a trademark of the BBC and is produced for PBS by WGBH under license from BBC Worldwide.
    WGBH and PBS are not responsible for the content of websites linked to or from ANTIQUES ROADSHOW Online.
    PBS is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization.

    ROADSHOW on Facebook ROADSHOW Tweets ROADSHOW on YouTube