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    John Falter "Saturday Evening Post" Illustration

    Appraised Value:

    $100,000 - $175,000

    Appraised on: July 28, 2007

    Appraised in: Louisville, Kentucky

    Appraised by: Kathleen Guzman

    Category: Paintings & Drawings

    Episode Info: Louisville, Hour 1 (#1213)

    Originally Aired: April 21, 2008

    slideshow IMAGE: 1 of 4 Next 

    More Like This:

    Form: Illustration
    Period / Style: 20th Century
    Value Range: $100,000 - $175,000

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    Comment

    Appraisal Video: (2:31)

    appraiser

    Appraised By:

    Kathleen Guzman
    Collectibles

    Heritage Auctions

    Appraisal Transcript:
    GUEST: Well, the little girl is me at age five. And the little boy in the pseudo spacesuit was a young neighbor. And we were posing for my stepfather, John Falter, who was one of the artists painting for the Saturday Evening Post.

    APPRAISER: Well, when we think of American illustrator art, everyone thinks of Norman Rockwell.

    GUEST: Yes.

    APPRAISER: Especially because of the very high prices that his art has been bringing and because he's done a lot of Saturday Evening Post covers.

    GUEST: Yeah. Yeah.

    APPRAISER: But Norman Rockwell called John Falter one of America's most gifted illustrators. This is a fantastic cover. The fact that you have this picture, which depicts you in the same pose, just really is a charming, charming piece.

    GUEST: Mm-hmm. We were in my stepfather's studio, outside San Francisco, and the background is all creative license.

    APPRAISER: John Falter, like a lot of the other Saturday Evening Post artists, has not risen to the sort of Norman Rockwell level. But there has been a lot more interest in this kind of second-tier sort of artist.

    GUEST: Mm-hmm.

    APPRAISER: As you probably know, about ten years ago, or earlier, this was a very hard thing to sell.

    GUEST: Yes, it was.

    APPRAISER: People weren't really looking for this. The market price on a picture like this was barely $5,000 to $7,000. It crept up to $10,000 to $15,000. Now, you've gotten this appraised. How much do you think it's valued at?

    GUEST: 50,000.

    APPRAISER: Well, this surge in price has only happened in the past five years.

    GUEST: Mm-hmm.

    APPRAISER: And although it hasn't been record-breaking, to the point of Rockwell,

    GUEST: Mm-hmm.

    APPRAISER: it's been record-breaking

    GUEST: Right.

    APPRAISER: towards Mr. Falter's prices. A few years ago, A Saturday Evening Post cover of Yankee Stadium, at auction, brought $150,000.

    GUEST: That's a lot of money. Yes.

    APPRAISER: Now, Yankee Stadium, in the 1947 cover, is kind of a specialized category.

    GUEST: Right, right.

    APPRAISER: This subject, though, is just as wonderful. As a presale auction estimate, something like this we would put between $100,000 to $150,000. Okay. And I'm sure, since this is an heirloom

    GUEST: Well, the little girl is me at age five. And the little boy in the pseudo spacesuit was a young neighbor. And we were posing for my stepfather, John Falter, who was one of the artists painting for the Saturday Evening Post.

    APPRAISER: Well, when we think of American illustrator art, everyone thinks of Norman Rockwell.

    GUEST: Yes.

    APPRAISER: Especially because of the very high prices that his art has been bringing and because he's done a lot of Saturday Evening Post covers.

    GUEST: Yeah. Yeah.

    APPRAISER: But Norman Rockwell called John Falter one of America's most gifted illustrators. This is a fantastic cover. The fact that you have this picture, which depicts you in the same pose, just really is a charming, charming piece.

    GUEST: Mm-hmm. We were in my stepfather's studio, outside San Francisco, and the background is all creative license.

    APPRAISER: John Falter, like a lot of the other Saturday Evening Post artists, has not risen to the sort of Norman Rockwell level. But there has been a lot more interest in this kind of second-tier sort of artist.

    GUEST: Mm-hmm.

    APPRAISER: As you probably know, about ten years ago, or earlier, this was a very hard thing to sell.

    GUEST: Yes, it was.

    APPRAISER: People weren't really looking for this. The market price on a picture like this was barely $5,000 to $7,000. It crept up to $10,000 to $15,000. Now, you've gotten this appraised. How much do you think it's valued at?

    GUEST: 50,000.

    APPRAISER: Well, this surge in price has only happened in the past five years.

    GUEST: Mm-hmm.

    APPRAISER: And although it hasn't been record-breaking, to the point of Rockwell,

    GUEST: Mm-hmm.

    APPRAISER: it's been record-breaking

    GUEST: Right.

    APPRAISER: towards Mr. Falter's prices. A few years ago, A Saturday Evening Post cover of Yankee Stadium, at auction, brought $150,000.

    GUEST: That's a lot of money. Yes.

    APPRAISER: Now, Yankee Stadium, in the 1947 cover, is kind of a specialized category.

    GUEST: Right, right.

    APPRAISER: This subject, though, is just as wonderful. As a presale auction estimate, something like this we would put between $100,000 to $150,000. Okay. And I'm sure, since this is an heirloom Yeah. in your family, this is something that you're going to want to keep.

    GUEST: Absolutely. Mm-hmm.

    APPRAISER: I would say for an insurance value, you should put at least $175,000 on it.

    GUEST: Yeah.

    APPRAISER: in your family, this is something that you're going to want to keep.

    GUEST: Absolutely. Mm-hmm.

    APPRAISER: I would say for an insurance value, you should put at least $175,000 on it.

    GUEST: Okay. Thank you.



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